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 Post subject: patterning with software
PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 7:51 pm 
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I agree...Firefox rules! I use IE at work and wish they would let me use firefox.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 02, 2007 5:46 pm 
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I have created a program that generates shoe patterns such as those described by George Koleff.
This program is now available on the Internet here:

http://www.romangoshoes.com/shoeweb/

I have permission from the publishers of George's book: "Shoe and Boot Designing Manual based on the Geometric Method" to include his patterns in the program. So far, I have only entered a few patterns from the book but I hope to get many of them input eventually.

If you want to use the existing patterns, you need do no more than enter the required measurements and generate the pattern.

Also, the program allows anyone to create their own patterns and make them public for others to use or keep them private for their own use. Anyway, rather than blather on about it, you can take a look for yourself.

Of course, this is a work in progress and needs many things, not least of which is better documentation.

The program is provided free in the interest of supporting and promoting bespoke shoemaking. I have already found it very useful.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 03, 2007 9:52 am 
Rick,

I am impressed!! Based on the amount of work put into the simple last spreadsheet, I can only imagine the effort that went into this program. Not sure I understand everything yet, but it works. Guess I will have to buy the book. Thank you.

Chuck


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:49 am 
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Fred,

Over in "Correcting Common Foot Problems" you asked about using a scanner and so forth...

At the head of this topic, there are several software programs that, while taking some time to learn (but it's fun...mostly) are very powerful and can do all you might want to do and they are free!

Bottom line is that when I want to generate a sketch or an illustration to post, I will make the sketch freehand and scan it in to the computer.

(Scanners are pretty cheap these days...some very good ones going for less than $150.00.)

Then I "import" the sketch into a drawing program (such as Inkscape or DrawPlus ...or I have CorelDraw) and "trace" over it. I can do this automatically but prefer to do it by hand as it is far more accurate. Then I can "cleanup" and/or modify the sketch and label it. The result is as professional as it can be done.

Scanning in photos and lithographs from old books is also a breeze and requires only optional clean up.

A scanner is a must in my "office" and a good digital camera is also mandatory for my business, but neither one of them is worth much without the supporting software and the will to learn/use it.

Tight Stitches
DWFII--Member HCC


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:11 pm 
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A couple of additions to The Shoe Pattern Generator: I've added Koleff pattern - Men's Oxford, straight toe cap.

I've also added a new feature: scanned images of the patterns, with curves drawn, are now possible. I haven't got examples for all patterns yet but there is an example here.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2008 12:40 pm 
Brendan,

Welcome to the forum. Good people, good questions, good answers. What I am doing is not all that sophisticated, strictly 2D, flat patterns. No “Lightbeam” or CNC stuff. Various books (Koleff’s “Last Designing & Making”, DW’s books and others) show how to draw various boot and shoe patterns based on various measurements of the foot (short heel, foot length, ball girth, etc.).

With an Excel spreadsheet, using the foot measurements as an input, I write formulas for the X and Y coordinates of the points on the drawings in the books or my modification. Higher up in this thread I offered copies for Koleff’s last book. Same rules still apply.

AutoCAD (and I am sure others) will accept scripts. These are text instructions that tell AutoCAD to draw a line from point “A” to point “B”, circles, splines, etc. Portions of the Excel spreadsheet with or without additional spline points are copied and converted to comma de-limited text and input into AutoCAD. The output is a full scale drawing of the part based on the individual foot measurements. I first saw something similar used to draw airfoil sections. Rubber cement to poster board and you have a pattern for that boot. AutoCAD also accepts Visual Basic which is the same as Excel, but don’t know how to do it.

Probably not worth the effort for the amount of boots I make, but now you know how to make a watch. If you really want to be impressed, look at what Rick Roman is doing with Keoleff’s patterns in this thread.

Chuck


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 06, 2008 2:45 pm 
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Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2007 9:41 am
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Location: Fort Qu'Appelle, SK, Canada
Hi Chuck
Thanks for the quick and useful reply. Couple questions. Are you doing this in a lateral view, using a "mean Fome" or are you doing a dorsal view like looking at a tracing or a pedograph print,? What is your Grid spacing for your x y coordinates. for a workable pattern.
Regards
BB


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 07, 2008 10:31 am 
Brendan,

Hate to admit it, have seen the term “mean fome” on the forum, but have no idea what it means. If it means a side profile view of the last, Yes, Koleff’s profile points are on the spreadsheet I offered. I use a modified version with spline points for boot last profiles. Koleff’s insole points (pedograph?) are also on the spread sheet and use it as a guide. I put more faith in the footprint tracing or pedograph. IMO, Koleff and most lasts do not do a good job of accommodating--what’s the word?--pronation (sp), the curve of the bottom of the foot. Blocker and top patterns work nicely. Still struggling with counter patterns based on heel height.

I seldom use grid points for layouts. Patterns are drawn to two decimal places (0.01) using inches or to one millimeter if metric.

Chuck


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 12:21 pm 
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Location: Fort Qu'Appelle, SK, Canada
Hi Chuck
Thanks for getting back. The "Mean Forme" is a lateral view of a last. An old Dutch shoemaker i worked for 1980.s made his with dampened paper. and in the unhumid conditions of Alberta in the winter the patterns would distort over lunch time. It is a medial and lateral sort of meet you half way if the lines aren't exactly exact. For example if you use a last with a straight cone medial and lateral or near the same. and a last with the cone more medial the medial and lateral lines start to vary more in the fore part. When I do custom shoes for feet the are Real bad to get the right opening and some esthetics I make medial and lateral quarters with minimal regard about makeing a Mean, as it would not fit worth a darn and quite often have to make a pattern for left and right due to size differance and leg length diecepancy etc. I use 2 inch packing tape to cover the lasts, instead of paper as it is more like leather and doesn't distort with time.
Also when dealing with two feet that are different in size and shape it wakes it much easier to make them look closer to each other. Put 2-3 peices of tape on the last and buldup if included., make sure the tape goes on at 45 degrees if possible. Draw your center line up the heel and front to center the patern. use some basic dimentioning from your Koleff's or others geo matics for proportions draw your opening spacing for laces. Make any radius to the quarters freehand to were the vamp is attached. You can draw in a back strap, counter additions, decoration or and thing pertinant ie. if you using a velcro closure instead of laces. Start with the more "normal side the work on the mate. Using the first on and it is quite easy to scetch a duplicate pattern to the otherside. draw your center line and free hand it. use a pen and if you don't like the line then rub it off with your finger and redraw. when you get what is pleasing to the eye and functional put another layer or to of tape on. You can use this to cut all the shapes right on the last. stick it on some firm paper and label the peices draw on you allowances for turning edges. vamp underlay at the counter seam, lasting allowance or any other seaming options. This may offend some but it is fast, accurate and saves much head scrathing.when making a pattern and saves some colorful language when you go to last the upper.
As for counter patterns they can be tricky as you are taking a multi curved, radiused shape and trying to make from a flat sheet of leather. Perhaps you could try the tape method on the last just at the back and draw it out cut it out and see what comes off vs what is drawn from the flat. This might help you understand why you are having troubles,
regards
Brendan


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 13, 2008 1:08 pm 
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Just a caution...I know this discussion originates with Chuck's comment about using Excel to create patterns. And rightfully so, as this topic was created to deal with computer tech and how it relates to shoemaking or the concerns of shoemakers.

If the discussion seems to want to turn to pattern making in a general way, it would be more appropriate in another topic....for instance: Open Forum: Techniques, Crans and Visualizations: Pattern making

Yr. Hmb. Svt.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 12:52 am 
Rick, what you made is fantastic! How can we use it? I just tried to make a pattern, but maybe I didn't find all the possibilities. What I already made with it, also worth to archive that program here, but I am sure there are more..


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 9:15 am 
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Thanks Marcell.

I agree, it is fantastic. I now use it for all my patterns. So far, it is not being used by others but I think that will come in time.

It's quite a bit of work to get each pattern set up so it is slow going. I'm planning a zipper boot for my daughter soon. So that's next.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 9:23 am 
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Maybe I didn't answer the part of your question on how to use it.

You can go to the measurements page and enter the measurements for your foot. Then go to the styles link, pick your style and generate. Then you have to figure out how to get it printed.

More advanced use:
If you want the program to remember your measurements, you need to have a log-in, set up a customer and make the measurements you enter belong to that customer.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 14, 2008 10:31 am 
Brendan,

Thanks for the definition of "Mean Forme". I have the greatest respect for shoemakers, and in particular, orthopedic shoemakers. You did a good discription of shoe pattern making, but much was above my skill level. Keep up the good work and maybe I will learn. DW's answer in the pattern making thread helped solve my counter problem.

Chuck


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:11 pm 
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I've added Koleff STANDARD for Ankle Boots and Women's Zip-Up Knee Boots (based on this standard to the Pattern Generator here: http://www.romangoshoes.com/shoeweb/style.do?mode=styleView&style_id=15

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and here: http://www.romangoshoes.com/shoeweb/style.do?mode=styleView&style_id=17

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2008 1:45 pm 
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Move this if it's not in the right spot.
A student has posted a video of his training at Shoeschool.com. Here's the link.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQubciEEYQs

This is where several posters on HCC learned to make shoes.

Georgene


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2008 2:25 pm 
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Georgene
I watched the video. Interesting method of closing. Where is shoeschool located?

How were the uppers and linings attached? It's hard to see if they are big Stitches or Staples ?

Regards
Brendan


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 19, 2008 3:38 pm 
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Shoeschool.com is is Port Townsend, Washington, picture postcard waterside town. The shoe is completely hand-stitched. Lining and upper are joined by the stitching along topline and eyelet facings. This was white running stitches on black leather. When I took the class in '03 others in my class used saddlestitches.

The blue lasting stand glimpsed in the video looks like one of Dick Anderson's

Regards,
Georgene


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:16 am 
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Georgene,
Thanks for posting the link to the shoe school,that is one hack of steaming shoe maker,how long was the course? I think his simple method is very helpful to a starter,not to mention the location.
Regards Nasser


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:57 pm 
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Nasser, after 5 days beginners have made their first pair of shoes and return home with a basic set of tools.
Georgene


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:04 pm 
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It's where I started too!


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 8:53 am 
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Here is a quick tutorial on how to make nice shoe pictures using Adobe PhotoShop 6. I made the video using "Jing", a free product that records what you are doing on the screen along with your voice.

http://www.screencast.com/t/PRqClVs7kM


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 12:19 pm 
Rick,
WHAT A GREAT SOFTWARE!!!
It runs smoothly in my mac.
Thanks a lot for sharing it!
Angel

(Message edited by angel on June 10, 2008)


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 8:41 pm 
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A little side project I've been working on intermittently for a couple of years is a last scanner.

I'm starting to get some good results now. You can check it out at: http://lastscanner.blogspot.com/

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 16, 2011 11:40 pm 
Rick, you are a seriously clever man. When Peter Jackson headhunts you can you put in a good word for me Image?
Outstanding.
T.


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