Skiving for fun

This off topic area is a place where, while you are visiting the Crispin Colloquy, you can talk about beer, whiskey, kilts, the latest WWII re-enactment, BBQ, grandsons, shoes in the media, and even the odd meandering essay on "why we make shoes."
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double

Skiving for fun

#1 Post by double » Sun Jan 04, 2009 12:31 pm

I was at Incredible Pizza (they have a pizza buffet and lots of games for the little ones to play) with my girl friend and her son yesterday. He was playing a game where you use a rifle (that shoots a light beam of some sort) at a target which in turn makes things move, squirt water, make noise, etc. On the back wall of this "game" there was a shelf of books. One really caught my eye and thought it strange because i don't know how many people actually know what skiving is let alone the little kids that were playing the game.

And I was actually wondering if anyone has read the book and if it helped... Image
8694.jpg

erickgeer

Re: Skiving for fun

#2 Post by erickgeer » Sun Jan 04, 2009 3:33 pm

I think it is British slang for slacking off.

If I'm right, I credit the Harry Potter books Image

Erick

double

Re: Skiving for fun

#3 Post by double » Sun Jan 04, 2009 4:54 pm

Erick,

You are correct about a different meaning to the word. I don't know if it is english slang or not but i found a definition for skive

"Noun. An evasion of one's tasks, a period of shirking.
Verb. To evade doing one's work or duties, to truant. E.g."Every Friday afternoon you can guarantee he'll be skiving and getting drunk down the pub.""

C Double

thomd

Re: Skiving for fun

#4 Post by thomd » Fri Jan 30, 2009 4:06 pm

It is English. Never heard it in Canada, or US. Heard it in UK, Ireland.

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dearbone
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Re: Skiving for fun

#5 Post by dearbone » Fri Jan 30, 2009 5:40 pm

Thom,

Believe or not,I had an Irish descent Canadian woman friend here at the shop the other day when i was telling her about a personality of someone,when she suddenly said "He is a skiver: my jaws fell to the ground,i asked her what she meant by "skiver" and she replied a "trimmer" i was amazed! when i asked her about the word, she said she watches "Coronation street".

Nasser

thomd

Re: Skiving for fun

#6 Post by thomd » Sun Feb 01, 2009 12:16 am

I believe you, it might be more of a problem over there. Many years ago when I was in competitive sports, I can remember people talking about the unfair advantage they had with the dole and people being able to train full time without worrying about money. Of course that is a pretty strenuous version of skiving (and probably mostly sour grapes). I was surprised to hear that things have gotten worse from the perpective of a wack of visiting young UK counsins last summer. You can't skive in Canada, there is always the snow to shovel and the woodstove to feed, or a mosquito squadron to swat (at least that is my story).

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Re: Skiving for fun

#7 Post by athan_chilton » Sun Jan 08, 2012 10:02 am

Did anyone happen to listen to 'Says You' on NPR this morning (Sunday, Jan. 8, 2012)? One of the words to be defined (or bluffed about) was 'naumkeag'!! And the contestants did not guess it right, though many in the audience apparently did! There must be plenty of shoemakers or at least shoe repair folks in Seattle!!

It was one of the few times I actually knew the meaning of the word they presented. Most of the others aren't even IN any of the dictionaries I own!

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Re: Skiving for fun

#8 Post by WilliaM » Wed Jul 03, 2013 4:58 am

hi it is really very nice and informatics information.you did very good job keep it up

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Re: Skiving for fun

#9 Post by anakim » Wed Dec 18, 2013 8:34 am

I am Canadian, and the first use of the word I ever heard was "shirking one's tasks" or something like that. It was in high school, a naughty English teacher taught us the word, so we would know how to properly term our irresponsible behaviour!!

(I am skiving at the moment, actually trying to search the forum for discussion of skiving knives, angles, sharpening and use, and came up with this!!)

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Re: Skiving for fun

#10 Post by dw » Wed Dec 18, 2013 10:06 am

anakim wrote:I am Canadian, and the first use of the word I ever heard was "shirking one's tasks" or something like that. It was in high school, a naughty English teacher taught us the word, so we would know how to properly term our irresponsible behaviour!!

(I am skiving at the moment, actually trying to search the forum for discussion of skiving knives, angles, sharpening and use, and came up with this!!)
If I recall correctly the Brits use "paring" to refer to thinning the edge of a piece of leather, as well.

So if you're feeling guilty about "skiving", you can always pare instead. :)
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