Tools to Make

Got any great sources for leather? Tools? Machinery? Looking for sources?
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RileyCraig

Tools to Make

#1 Post by RileyCraig » Sun Mar 17, 2002 5:23 pm

In the very near future I am going to make and sell crimping boards through my boot shop. We will make them from a hard wood, i.e., Poplar, White Ash, or Maple, and also from Teflon. So far my search for Maple has been rather futile, but I will continue to try.

All boards will be notched for crimping screws, unless otherwise specified, and we will make them to meet your specifications, should you so desire, with a guarantee that your pattern will not end up in another boot shop.

I would appreciate any feed-back, and would like to hear from any interested parties. A price list is in the works.

Thanks,

Riley Craig
rilenet@cniemail.com

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Re: Tools to Make

#2 Post by admin » Tue Mar 19, 2002 8:33 pm

Riley,

I have deleted your last message. As has been stated repeatedly, The Crispin Colloquey is an adjunct of The Honourable Cordwainers' Company--a 501 C-3, non-profit, educational organization.

As such no messages may be posted that blatently solicit sales for personal profit. Effectively, what that means is that you may mention you have an item for sale, you may describe it, you may offer your email address for further contact, but you may not quote prices on items from which you seek to gain a profit.

I might add that "Sources" is not really the appropriate topic for this type of post. "The Boughton Faire Memorial Bazaar" is the preferred area and functions as a somewhat restrained "classifieds section," such as it is. That would be the appropriate place to post your revised message.

I apologize if this seems a bit brusque. But this is the stated policy of the Guild and the Forum and, as such, can never be expressed too explicitly or too boldly...or too often. Nothing personal. And I also regret having to delete your message. Again, I cannot allow such messages to stand because, fundamentally, they threaten the non-profit status of the Guild. However, you are welcome to post a revised version of your post...omitting the prices, of course.

Yr. Hmb. Svt.

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Re: Tools to Make

#3 Post by admin » Sun May 05, 2002 12:26 pm

On 06 May, 2002, all post to this topic made prior to 25 February, 2002, were moved to the first Crispin Colloquy Archive CD.

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bct

Re: Tools to Make

#4 Post by bct » Sat Sep 21, 2002 4:22 pm

I purchased a pair of crimp screws from Dick Anderson at the Boot and Saddle Makers Round Up. And I must say that His crimp screws are by far the best design over the old style crimp screws. These screws do not require an additional piece of leather on each side of the vamp while crimping. Although I yet to crimp a pair of vamps using them. I have seen other boot shops that use them and swear by em. Thank You Dick Anderson

"Riding For The Brand"
Brian C. Thomas

rosynay

Re: Tools to Make

#5 Post by rosynay » Sat Sep 21, 2002 5:23 pm

Brian & All:

My daughter and son in law gave me a
set of Dick Anderson's crimp screwa for
Christmas. They are also a fine work
of art. My family knows to call Dick if they run out of ideas for my Christmas present.

RL

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Re: Tools to Make

#6 Post by jake » Sat Sep 21, 2002 5:59 pm

To All,

Dick's computer is on the blink at this moment. I'm sure he appreciates the kind remarks.

I too am a proud owner of several pairs of his crimping irons. Personally, I've never seen any better.

I was glad to hear D.W. made an exception to his following statement:
I will tell you this, however...in my not so humble opinion (IMNSHO) *all* the old tools of any repute are way better than *all* the new tools, even by the same manufacturer (excepting Dick Andersons tools, of course).


Of Course!

Dick Anderson

Re: Tools to Make

#7 Post by Dick Anderson » Thu Sep 26, 2002 8:39 pm

Thanks for the kind words. I do enjoy making a tool that works good for you.

judy

Re: Tools to Make

#8 Post by judy » Thu Sep 26, 2002 11:18 pm

I would like to contact Dick Anderson... does any kind person have an address please?

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Re: Tools to Make

#9 Post by dw » Fri Sep 27, 2002 5:14 am

Judy,

A keyword search will usually turn up an address like that...and/or you could just post a "Help! Dick! What's your address?" message (Dick does read the forum) right here on the board. But in lieu of all that and for the record (so it's available to any and all)...

Dick Anderson
ThornApple River Machine Works
N. 8566 Winter Rd.
Ladysmith, WI 54848
main voice (715) 532.6301
E-Mail: thornapple.boots@usa.net


Tight Stitches
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Dick Anderson

Re: Tools to Make

#10 Post by Dick Anderson » Fri Oct 04, 2002 9:14 am

If anyone has tried to mail me and it hasn't worked try again. Im' back on line again.

Dick

rosynay

Re: Tools to Make

#11 Post by rosynay » Fri Aug 08, 2003 2:52 pm

All:

Yesterday in Ace Hardware while walkng down the isle there was a work bench
which looked almost like the picture of the one in DW's book. It had been made of some sturdy iron frames which you
insert with two by fours. You buy the frames and add the boards. It was so innovative I wanted all of you to know
about them. When my garage gets cleared from my warehouse junk some of these frames will become my work bench.

These are called CREATE YOUR SHELF.
There is a colorful brochere available
of different configurations which can be made. They have a capacity for
six thousand lbs with 2 x 4's. I spent a lot of time in Home Depot, Lowes, Handy Dan and Builders Square over the years and I have never seen anything like these frames for shelves or anything which could compare with them or could be put together so easily.

Here is how to contact Alto Innovations
who makes them if any of you need a work bench or some shelves.

Alto Innovations
9913 Honeywell
Houston Tx 77074
1-866-myshelf toll free
Tel: 713-271-2002
Fax: 713-270-9202
email: www.createyourshelf.com
US Patent #6086172

tomo

Re: Tools to Make

#12 Post by tomo » Thu Feb 12, 2004 12:16 am

Not sure if this is the right forum to post in but...
At work we have two clicking boards dating back like 70-80 years made by BUSMC.

I was told the wood used is Deal, the individual blocks are 2½" x 2½" and 3½" high (end grain up) and the boards have a batten nailed along each side.
my question is this:

Does anyone know if the boards have steel rods or something else apart from glue and the battens tying them together?

The boards are about 4'6" x 2'6".
They are fantastic to click out on. When the boss got them (several years ago) they were well worn and sent them in to get machined. When the top was cleaned off you could see the broken tips from old knives sparkling.

I've gone through the archives but can only find mention of the synthetic rubber for cutting out on.

Any suggestions/advice?

Tom
More power to y'awl.

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Re: Tools to Make

#13 Post by dw » Thu Feb 12, 2004 6:37 am

Tom,

I'm talking through my hat here...so take it with a grain of salt. I have seen the kind of cutting board you talk about. I even think I've seen a schematic, and I do believe I remember there being steel rods to hold them together. Of course I can't even begin to speak to the cutting board you have. It may or may not have the rods.

I got to tell you though, it would alarm me, big time, if I saw the tips of old knives broken off in the surface I was about to cut on. I want my clicking knives super sharp and I don't want anything--hard spots or soft spots to deflect the tip of my knife...or to dull it either, for that matter.

I use a plastic cuttling board (3' x5') of the sort that professional chefs use. It's 3/8" thick and maybe of a slightly softer grade that some chefs prefer but essentially the same material.

When it's brand spanking new you have to be careful that the tip of your knife doesn't get caught in an old track and deflected off course; but that state of affairs doesn't last long. Once it's broken in, it is unbeatable, in my opinion. It never tracks, never resists the knife and yet is firm enough that cuts are clean. And as an extra benefit, it's virtually self-healing. So it seldon if ever needs ot be re-surfaced...and I've never broken a knife tip off in it.

Just some observations...hope this helps.

PS...Awl the best... Image

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tomo

Re: Tools to Make

#14 Post by tomo » Thu Feb 12, 2004 10:51 pm

DW, thanks for your feed back, I appreciate it. I always had the feeling that the plastic took the edge off your knives too fast, but after what you've said I guess my fears are unfounded. It would certainly be more convenient and lighter to use plastic - I had a good look at your pictures in the thread post. Thanks

More power to y'awl
Tom.

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Re: Tools to Make

#15 Post by jake » Thu Nov 18, 2004 5:17 pm

More and more I've started making my own tools to perform specific jobs. Here's something I came up with to substitute for a rhand file. Basically, it's a tongue depressor with some sandpaper glued to one side. Then I took it to the finisher and sanded the opposite side down to a very thin edge. It really does a nice job on the rhand, in my opinion, better than the rhand file.
3329.jpg
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Lucy

Re: Tools to Make

#16 Post by Lucy » Sun Oct 23, 2005 10:59 pm

Hi my name is Lucy, and I taking shoemaking class in NYC, I just brought the 5-1 machine, my question what is the 5 things the machine do. Because I see only three. And how you operate the machine, because doesn't have the manual. Thanks for any help.
Lucy

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Re: Tools to Make

#17 Post by dw » Mon Oct 24, 2005 4:20 pm

Lucy,

Check out the following link:

http://www.thehcc.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1951

the April 05, 2005 discussion


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tomo

Re: Tools to Make

#18 Post by tomo » Sun Feb 05, 2006 10:51 pm

Can anyone - Bill??

tell me what wood is usually used for lasts, or more specifically boot trees.
I'm about to have a go at turning some trees to make top boot uppers on, but before that I need to make some gaitors - these are worn with jodphur boots -elastic sided riding boots (chelsea type) to appear as though the rider has long boots on.

Is the wood a hardwood or softwood, strong grained or other?

Thanks.

More power to y'awl

T.

btippit

Re: Tools to Make

#19 Post by btippit » Mon Feb 06, 2006 8:08 am

Tom,

In the good old days, the wood used for lasts and most shoe trees was maple. To my knowledge that was the case for boot trees as well though someone else might know of another commonly used wood.

However, those days are long gone and the two most common woods being used in North America today come from Europe, being beech and hornbeam. Both are nice hardwoods but not near the quality of maple. I wouldn't think a soft wood would be as durable, as easy to work with, or as pleasing to the eye.

Hope this helps and good luck!

Bill “The Last Man Standing” Tippit
www.globalfootwearsolutions.com

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Re: Tools to Make

#20 Post by frank_jones » Wed Feb 08, 2006 5:07 pm

Tom O'Sullivan

I am not sure what type of trees you are planning to make. If you mean the ones used to shape the legs of riding boots, then perhaps the following is not appropriate.

Most of the wooden SHOE trees sold in the UK by the classic welted shoe makers (Church, Genson, Crockett and Jones, etc.) are made of cedar. Not only is the red wood attractive to look at, they claim the aroma it gives off keep the moths out of your wardrobe (closet).

I was in the Woodware Repetitions factory in Sheffield not long ago. You will recall this is run by Colin Barnsley and his brother. Not only have they taken on the Barnsley Tool business, they turn a wide variety of wooden tool handles supplied to other tool makers. Colin showed me an excellent reference book on timbers which lists all their properties. He tells me that cedar is a low density timber which probably means that it could dent where excessive pressure is exerted.

I know that Colin sometimes reads the Colloquy, perhaps he will “chip” in. Assuming he can tolerate my sense of humour (humor?).

Frank Jones
frank.jones@shoemaking.com

tomo

Re: Tools to Make

#21 Post by tomo » Thu Feb 09, 2006 3:59 am

Bill and Frank,
Thanks for your help.

Frank yes, they are the ones for shaping the leg over. Here is a picture of what I want to make.
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My thinking was that I could carry the idea on and then make the bottom of a boot on a last and eventually marry the two together, or at least use the boot trees to give me the right shape and size.

I'll make the trees adjustable so that one pair will be usefull for a small range of sizes.

Most of the English boot trees I've seen are made with a foot (last??), and a leg that is made in three parts. The centre piece is tapered and dovetails down between the two outer pieces spreading them within the confines of the boot.
What I want to do is make a screw type adjuster instead of the centre board, so that I can form the cased leather over them, let it dry and then use solution between the lining and outer.

The English ones were a work of art in their own right and beautifully made, in fact to get a pair like that now for use in riding boots would cost almost as much as the boots. The people who are lucky enough to own a pair of these trees treasure them.

You can see in the picture above that the gaitors are lined, have a zipper for closure and are rigid, ie they stand up by themselves.

Thanks again guys.

More power to y'awls.
T.

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Re: Tools to Make

#22 Post by das » Thu Feb 09, 2006 11:46 am

Tom,

Look at a Mallory adjustable boot stretcher here:

http://www.heelingtouch.com/shop/index.php?rec=10&shop=1&cart=99441&cat=5&keywor ds=&match_criteria=&searchCat=

If you build the calf portion up with layers of leather, and sand to shape, you can easily create ones shaped like English riding boots.

When making boots, even riding boots, only a last is ever used. The leg is "treed", later, on a tree. IOW, you don't make a boot on a tree, just shape the legs with one afterwards.

The traditional wooden trees for bootmakers were called "fitting tees", and were fully adjustable. You might find some old ones on Ebay or in antique shops, but I think the Mallory tree will do well for what you need.

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Re: Tools to Make

#23 Post by danfreeman » Sat Feb 11, 2006 5:21 am

Al is right about the use of trees.
Two types are made for the boots you mention: the maker uses hardwood trees (maple in this country, I've seen German trees made of ash, which is similar to oak--the wood need not be as fine-grained as that used for lasts). The wearer uses trees that would be useless to the maker: lightweight wood (poplar is used), and often hollowed out to save more weight.
Maker's trees come in sets of sizes, like lasts, but often have adjusting screws as well, for exact custom fit.

tomo

Re: Tools to Make

#24 Post by tomo » Sat Feb 11, 2006 3:09 pm

Dan and Al,
thanks for your input.

Al I checked out the Mallory stretcher and that's the type of thing I had in mind to make only in wood, as I have a lathe in the next room... I was surprised to see the range of boot stretchers the sell, I thought that was pretty impressive. As an after thought, is the stuff they use on the leather prior to stretching detrimental to the leather? I've come across its like before but was always reluctant to try it. The biggest problem we have with fit here is 'they're too tight in the calves.'

Dan where would I go to see the Maker's trees you referred too, who would make them? They're the ones I need, but I don't know about cost as I'm saving my pennies for some of Bill's lasts Image.

Thanks again for your help guys.

More power to y'awl.

T.

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Re: Tools to Make

#25 Post by das » Sat Feb 11, 2006 5:48 pm

Tom,

I've adapted a Mallory to the configuration for English riding boots by cementing on and shaping leather build-ups. I had thought about taking the guts out of a Mallory, and actually inserting it between the hollowed wooden front and back of an English riding boot tree, but this works so well for me, so far, that idea's gone out the window Image

If you want "real" wooden English "fitting-trees" for making, the last guy I talked to [Horace Batten Boots, Northampton] in 2001 just laughed. He uses his father's from the 1920s, but offered that they could possibly be duplicated, made new, for maybe $400 the pair! Had similar luck asking round in the West End. My best advice: find antique Peal riding boot trees for keeping boots on, and duplicate the shape exactly on a Mallory. This is 2006--not 1906--a lot of water has gone under the bridge, sad to say.

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