The Gallery

This is a photo gallery for members of the forum. Here you can share photos of your latest work for members to view. Like an Art gallery, however, where the exhibits come and go, photos will be deleted on a regular basis to save room on the server. Beauty, like Art, is fleeting.
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amuckart
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Re: The Gallery

#101 Post by amuckart » Tue Jun 05, 2007 3:14 am

This is a little out of the ordinary for this place but variety is good, right? Image

These are the 5th pair of shoes I've built. It's a pair of c1360s style low turnshoes, based on the ones on the effigy of Walter de Helyon in Much Marcle, Englad. The buckle on them is all wrong, but I'm waiting for the right ones to show up and I needed to wear them this weekend.
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There's a lot wrong with these, but the second one is noticeably better than the first one and with luck the next pair will be a little better again, and so it goes. The first one of these is the shoe that prompted my question about hand leathers. The second one I built after reading the replies and the sole went on it in about 2/3 the time it took me to do the first one.

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Re: The Gallery

#102 Post by dw » Tue Jun 05, 2007 6:23 am

Alasdair,

They look pretty good to me. It's interesting to see that kind of work.

I wonder how the foot feels inside the shoe with that turned seam exposed? Or do you put in an insole/sockliner kind of deal?


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Re: The Gallery

#103 Post by amuckart » Tue Jun 05, 2007 12:46 pm

DW, Thanks for your comments.

They're pretty comfortable to wear. All the closing seams are butted so there's no bulk in them and the edges at the lasting seam are trimmed back and burnished down pretty good. Those ones have pretty heavy uppers so they've pulled the edges of the sole up slightly all around which just makes for a bit of a concave footbed.

The wierdest thing about walking in them is having that slightly floppy toe sticking out 3 1/2 inches in front of my foot Image

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Re: The Gallery

#104 Post by kaspar » Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:49 am

Greetings

There has been some beautiful footwear.
More sole pictures are welcomed IMO. Like DW posted.
Paul and DW beautiful boots as usual. BTW. Paul the style of the 60´s boots was first created Andre Courreges and they went very popular in those days.
Rick You have the patient to do your lasts from the scrap. Keep up the work.
Alasdair turnups reminded me.....One antique salesman told he had two pair or something like that, these kind of medieval shoes, founded in the attics of Tallinn`s old town. He sold them with a huge lot of other old shoes to one Canadian collector/shopkeeper. Well even the national museum of Estonia does not have even a single shoe. They have bits and pieces. Maybe I have told this story here before. Do excuse my lack of memory then. Anyway great work Alasdair. Like the neat stitching (not through), done with the counters.

Cheers
K.

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Re: The Gallery

#105 Post by romango » Sat Jun 09, 2007 3:34 pm

Just finished these dance shoes.
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In pursuit of the most comfortable dancing possible, I made the insoles from Poron laminated to Texon fiber board. This is pretty standard construction for cheap dance shoes but the Poron I used is this relatively new (I think) stuff called ProZorb which is supposed to absorb moisture. The hope is to get a little cushioning without loosing the moisture absorption you get with leather. I will try ProZorb on leather, if these manage moisture well, because the way leather molds to the foot is an advantage in comfort too. Besides, the Texon will fail eventually. Here is an action shot:
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Re: The Gallery

#106 Post by jenny_fleishman » Sat Jun 09, 2007 6:45 pm

Nice shoes, Rick! What did you build the heels out of? What kind of leather did you use for the uppers (both lining and outer leather)? Thanks!

Jenny

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Re: The Gallery

#107 Post by dw » Sat Jun 09, 2007 7:13 pm

Rick,

Those are really nice. What is the heel height? Did you make the lasts? I've been thinking about making myself some dance shoes. I like the colour. Very Argentine Tango. I too would like to know the leather.

And hey...bring them...please.

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Re: The Gallery

#108 Post by romango » Sun Jun 10, 2007 8:00 am

The gray leather is from the bargain table at Oregon Leather. It is undoubtedly cowhide, 1mm thick and medium stiffness. Most leather shops I have been to seem to have an upholstery, garment and saddlery focus. Usually too thin, thick or rubbery. So, I am always on the prowl for leather of a good thickness and stiffness for shoes. The lining is pigskin liner from Tandy Leather Factory in Portland. It's OK but a little inconsistent to use. I'm looking for something better.

The heel is 1 inch. It is crepe (I believe that is what this thick, lightweight black stuff is called), built up much like I would do a stacked leather heel. The heel lift is heavy duty Vibram. I would not use this crepe for a customer as the attachment to the shoe is glue only. I do use it for test shoes because it is quick and easy to cut and shape. Since these are just for me, I don't mind the less than robust heel attachment.

The last is a cast last. I've yet to adjust or make a wood last that fits as well as this one. But I would like to be able to. I believe I get a superior short heel fit with a cast than I have been able to achieve by adjusting wood lasts.
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Re: The Gallery

#109 Post by shoestring » Sun Jun 10, 2007 1:12 pm

Rick,
I tried that same leather from Tandy's and it's good for fitters only IMO.As for your shoes they look like 2 stepping shoes(fancy dancing) or as they say in South Carolina"Shagging"shoes, nice job and happy dancing.

Ed

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Re: The Gallery

#110 Post by romango » Sun Jun 10, 2007 2:58 pm

Thanks Ed. These shoes are restricted to Argentine tango. Image

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Re: The Gallery

#111 Post by jenny_fleishman » Sun Jun 10, 2007 6:44 pm

Rick, I have been using kidskin purchased from Shrut & Asch Leather Co., 617-247-2288. I usually talk to Hank. Don't know if the quality of the leather is what you are looking for, but it is very reasonably priced. They sent me swatch rings that must have about 50 different colors, and a few different finishes. If you call them for swatches, make sure they include the smaller ring that has the nappa cabretta on it. I have some black that I'm going to try for dance shoes at some point. They also have some nice metallics that I will also try for dance shoes eventually.

Jenny

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Re: The Gallery

#112 Post by romango » Mon Jun 11, 2007 10:57 am

Thanks Jenny. I talked to Hank and he is sending me some samples. Image

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Re: The Gallery

#113 Post by jenny_fleishman » Mon Jun 11, 2007 11:38 am

Rick, is Oregon Leather the same place as MacPherson Leather? If so, have you checked out their calfskin? I have a few small swatches, and am interested in trying it someday, but because of the size of the hides, the investment is more than I want to make at this time. Do you have any experience with that leather?

re your dance shoes...did you use shanks in them, and if so, what kind? Thanks!

Jenny

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Re: The Gallery

#114 Post by romango » Mon Jun 11, 2007 11:48 am

Jenny: Oregon Leather is in Eugene and Portland. MacPherson is in Seattle. I have been there but don't recall seeing any liner leather that appealed to me.

For the dance shoes I used a regular "mens shank" which is 4.5 X 5/8 inch. I am intrigued by the idea of wood or leather shanks, however.

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Re: The Gallery

#115 Post by jenny_fleishman » Mon Jun 11, 2007 1:45 pm

Rick, sounds like the same shanks I've been using.

The leather from MacPherson I was referring to is calfskin for the outer leather, not lining. I actually liked the feel of it. I got two swatches of black from them at different times, and the thickness was slightly different. It might be thicker than what you are looking for, but if you are collecting swatches, it might be worth having them send you one. In my inexperience, I thought the quality looked good, and the finish was less shiny than other calfskin swatches I've gotten elsewhere.

http://www.macphersonleather.com/shoe_and_lining_leather.htm

Jenny

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Re: The Gallery

#116 Post by chuck_deats » Wed Jun 13, 2007 11:09 am

Pair #6 For a teen-age gal who wants to be a marine biologist. French calf vamps, not up to professional standards, but getting better. Learned Paul's lesson: Don't stitch on white.
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Re: The Gallery

#117 Post by dw » Wed Jun 13, 2007 11:51 am

Chuck,

Wow!! Those are great, Chuck. These were blocked as a full wellington, weren't they?

Very impressive. I really like the dolphins.

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Re: The Gallery

#118 Post by paul » Wed Jun 13, 2007 12:46 pm

Chuck,

Hey! Those look great! I see you've grafted an Opera style top into your full cut design. Very cool! That had to be somewhat of a challenge with the waves and all. Are the dolphins part of the foot too?

Looks like a really nice job on the inlays too!

PK

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Re: The Gallery

#119 Post by shoestring » Wed Jun 13, 2007 2:24 pm

Chuck,

#6 looks real good,keep up the good work.

Ed

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Re: The Gallery

#120 Post by chuck_deats » Thu Jun 14, 2007 1:47 pm

DW, Paul, Ed,

Thank you very much for your kind words. The boots are full Wellingtons made in DW's Opera style, which means the dolphins are part of the foot. The assembly was done using Jake Dobbins' plate glass technique. A bunch of fun skiving. Inlays per Paul and Jake, but not in the same league. All stitched together on a 29-4 patcher. BTW, Thanks to Tom Mattimore. Crimping is not perfect, but better than
I had done before.

Chuck

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Re: The Gallery

#121 Post by proxy_posting » Wed Jun 27, 2007 6:30 pm

For Jesse lee Cantrell...

Copies of boots made in the 1880's. These are waxed 2oz. cow, fully lined. Side seams are 6 to the inch with #7 Barbours. Soles are 13 to the inch double pegged. The pattern was drawn on by eye using guides. The brass nails are done by eye. I can do them perfectly symmetrical, but have a preference for a 'primitive' look. JLC
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Re: The Gallery

#122 Post by paul » Thu Jun 28, 2007 4:56 am

Jesse,

Hey, we finally get a look at your work! It's wonderful! I really like these. No doubt, they do have that "old timey" look! And boy, you sure do have a nice crimp on those!

Looking closely at the leather in the third shot, I'm aware of the work you put into the waxing process. And I've always kind of liked that off-set of ears like that. Was that common back in the day? Are they stitched down?

The symmetry of your stitch pattern, drawn by hand with guides, sure does show years of practice. Is that the stitcher you used in the background?

And the brass nails in the heel bases intrigues me. Do you wet the base before setting those? I'd wonder about causing gaps in the layers, but there must be a way you have of avoiding that.

Could you share with us a little about the "tex-mex" description you give these?

PK

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Re: The Gallery

#123 Post by firefly » Thu Jun 28, 2007 7:47 am

Jesse Lee,

Wow, you really do go all the way with an authentic look. These really look like something I might see in a museum down here.

I like that flesh side out. It looks rugged, Now I understand what you guys were talking about. I have since seen a saddle made by Al Stohlman that was done all flesh side out and he even carved on the flesh side. That's very cool and unique.

I do like the offset mule ear pulls. Was that done for leverage when pulling on the boots? I've always thought that a pull mounted closer to the back would be more functional.

If I may comment in terms of feeling here...these boots have warmth and charm and they seem to bring me back to a time when our forefathers lived a much different life.

I know that's a bit sappy but I think you have to feel something when you look at a piece of work. Those feelins that folks get when they take in your work are what differentiate you from some off the shelf boot. I know we can go into the whole construction and materials thing but I appreciate being taken back to a time that, now only exists in someone's heart.

Thanks Jesse Lee.

Mark

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Re: The Gallery

#124 Post by jesselee » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:19 am

Mark,

Glad you can recognize and appreciate old timey boots. So different from the reenactment stuff, huh!
Can't beat that waxed flesh out. Scrape it up any way you can and still you can correct it and toss a shine on 'em.
Hey, Al Stohlman, he was the best tooler and carver. Is he still around? never got to meet him. but, yup, flesh out can indeed be tooled and carved.
The mule ears were alwasy offset like that. It is more functional and between the lining and outer, it's strong. Only modern boots have the pulls at the side seams. Looks all wrong to me LOL.
Thanks for the words on 'feelings'. Yeah, you almost visualize them in front of the wagon by a bedroll or in front of the fireplace in a cabin. So sad that ther makers of reenactment boots can't even get it far, yet close. makin this old stuff is... hmm is, well like having an antique pair of boots. Guess I'll never stop doin it. now to find an apprentice, YEEHAW!
Sappy just translates to romantic in a truthful way, it conveys sentiment.
Thanks again for the good words Mark.
JesseLee

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Re: The Gallery

#125 Post by jesselee » Thu Jun 28, 2007 8:47 am

Paul

Couldn't of been the shine, I ain't run any since 83, so she just musta not posted so I'll do it again. See the quotes***. I think each point deserves attention.

Hey, we finally get a look at your work!....

****Thank you. Gotta be old timey, I learned from a feller who was a kid back then when he apprenticed. Sure wish I could do them pretty boots like y'all do here tho! And yes, I did a base and cruel crimp.

Looking closely at...

****The waxing is done after the fact. The boot is made raw, then after pulling on the last the flesh side is sealed with hot paste. It is just flour and water and rubbed in vigorously, then scraped smooth. Then when dry the dye is applied and then a heavy waxing and polish. The more they is waxed and polished the smoother they gets. As to the mule ears, they are stitched down (some were not) and they was always offset on the back panel in the 1860-90 time frame. They is betwixt the lining and the outer. Very strong.

The symmetry of....

*****I used the 1906 Singer and the one in the picture is my baby, 1878 Bradbury A1 Stitcher, owned by my shop master. It's an American made/assembled Bradbury, meaning the base was cast and made here and the head imported from England. The symatry of the stitch pattern is a factor of grids, which my book teaches. In them, one can plot by eye the design. Thats how I did the boots of 'Donna maria Sanchez' (I posted the story here) and the pics are on my photobucket site. Remember, in the early days things were simple and there was not the artistic flare that y'all have today. Can't wait to do a 2-3 row stitched pair. Never done that before.

And the brass nails......

****Thats a Spanish influence. They used brass, copper and silver nails. And heels always being a visual of the upper class, were concentrated on in this way. How I did it was to cut and rasp the heels, then a final filing (no trimmer or finisher was used). Then a hot paste and work it in, about 6 hours on and off to seal the heels. Then after each application of paste the heel is burnished with a bone folder (fekk). When dry the heel becomes really hard and you can set the nails. After setting, dye the heel anduse a file to true them. So simple when the magician explains the trick.

Could you share with us a little about the "tex-mex" description you give these?

*****Well, the Spanish brought the style to old Mexico, no doubt from Spain and Europe. Tight on the calf, decorated and heavy duty. These will outlast me. In Mexico, the cowboys, before ours were hearding horses and cattle and eventually in the 50's-60's along the Texas border, the styles merged. These are a combination of a Mexican stitch and a texas cavalry boot. And, to get that slope towards the front (for riding a horse as opposed to walking) a common Civil War period last was used. They were for a 1 to 1 1/2 inch heel, so lasting with a 2 inch hel brought the boot foreward giving that old timey look. I have examined many original pairs made on CW lasts with 2 to 4 inch heels and that is how to get the look, don't use a last made for a taller heel. lisa noticed the front of the heel was even with the side seam. This is an 1860-1880 thang. In the 1880's and after, the front of the heel was brought foreward of the side seam for the Cuban heel. so now to the Sanchez boots and a pair of 1850's boots which are patterned after those worn by a Confederate cavalryman. Then, my 1860 totally hand stitched boots, like the fancy stitching is all by hand too. May do the top line on the Bradbury, as it's period.
JesseLee

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