Finishing techniques

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dw
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Re: Finishing techniques

#176 Post by dw » Fri Mar 13, 2015 2:45 pm

grenik » Fri Mar 13, 2015 12:01 pm wrote:I have learned so much from this site and have made a couple pairs of shoes (one that I am even able to wear for work!) Still in the beginning stages. I am not sure if this forum is the correct spot, but how is the burnished toe in these pictures achieved? Is it done after the shoe is complete with polish or is it put into the leather before closing the upper, after it is on the last, etc?

Because the color seems to go all the way to the upper/sole interface, it seems like these are done beofre the outsole is attached?

Thank you
Every maker has his own technique. Some creams can work for antiquing some leathers. Sometimes it requires special emulsions created specifically for antiquing. Some even use an airbrush.

Personally I use shoe creams whenever possible--I like Saphir for this kind of work--and I try to do antiquing (with small brushes and a very handy soft cloth) as part of the final finishing.
DWFII--HCC Member
Without "good" there is no "better," without "better," no "best."
And without the recognition that there is a hierarchy of excellence in all things, nothing rises above the level of mundane.

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dmcharg
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Re: Finishing techniques

#177 Post by dmcharg » Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:16 pm

G'day All,
I've been going through this thread, and I know it was 3 years ago (and it may have been answered, I just haven't got that far yet :) ), but DWF was talking about 'crow wheels' and 'bunk' wheels, and that Arford sold them but he didn't know what they were for. I've got a bunk wheel handle ('Abraham' Northhampton) and was chatting to my wife, Sandra, about this, this morning, and so she did a quick search and found this. Seems that, for us hand sewers it's a load of Bunk! :D

Cheers
Duncan

http://www.search.staffspasttrack.org.u ... hemeID=579

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dw
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Re: Finishing techniques

#178 Post by dw » Mon Jun 20, 2016 8:32 pm

dmcharg » Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:16 pm wrote:G'day All,
I've been going through this thread, and I know it was 3 years ago (and it may have been answered, I just haven't got that far yet :) ), but DWF was talking about 'crow wheels' and 'bunk' wheels, and that Arford sold them but he didn't know what they were for. I've got a bunk wheel handle ('Abraham' Northhampton) and was chatting to my wife, Sandra, about this, this morning, and so she did a quick search and found this. Seems that, for us hand sewers it's a load of Bunk! :D

Cheers
Duncan

http://www.search.staffspasttrack.org.u ... hemeID=579
Maybe DAS could speak more to this but, if I understand correctly, something about the description doesn't ring true. From calling it a heel seat wheel to the suggesti0n that the marks made will be parallel to the edge of the outsole, to the idea that such marks will somehow make ti look more like it was hand stitched.

It may be as simple as the possibility (probability) that the the person who wrote the description was/is not a shoemaker, but it seems like the description is somehow a conflation of two or three different tools into the one.
DWFII--HCC Member
Without "good" there is no "better," without "better," no "best."
And without the recognition that there is a hierarchy of excellence in all things, nothing rises above the level of mundane.

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