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Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:50 pm
by gshoes
ImageImageImageImageImageImage

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:51 pm
by gshoes
Sorry about the big pics.

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 7:19 pm
by dlskidmore
Any moving or removable part? Any holes other than the one flange?

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Tue Oct 02, 2012 7:41 pm
by gshoes
Denise,

Thanks for asking. There are no other holes besides a few where the round ivory inlays have come out. No moving parts.

geri

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Tue Oct 09, 2012 4:50 pm
by bobcann
Geri, What a great little gizmo you've got there! It's surely a winner in the "what is it" contest. I have no idea what it might be, however one guess is that it isn't for making twine, or string, or rope. Usually in that process the 3 (or more) parts like the eyes would be around the edge but facing 90 degrees from yours, and they would be able to spin to make the smaller fibers into thin threads that would then be twisted to make the twine or rope. Also, the flange/orifice on the end doesn't show much wear as would probably be seen if it were used for spinning. It's a bit large for an amulet, but would certainly serve that purpose. Maybe originally had a cork for the end? Maybe to hold snuff, or other inhaleable stuff? When I originally saw it I thought it was a powder horn, but it's too small for that. I'll keep thinking about it. Thanks for sharing it. Robert

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Wed Oct 10, 2012 7:44 am
by gshoes
Robert,
Thanks for your reply. I do think that you are correct and that it may not be for thread or rope making. But I was thinking that it would NOT be a part of the thread making process that turns but rather the spreader that is suspended from the strands before they are combined to keep each strand from curling around itself. I think the rope makers call it the spreader or the paddle, But the usually don't have closed eyes. And if a weight was tied to the flange it might help it better for different weight threads.

Geri

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Sat Dec 22, 2012 10:08 pm
by bdadamovicz
Well yesterday I posted in the towne faire that I had some extra edge irons I'm willing to part with. As I bought so many while I was in Germany and much of what I bought was little groups of items many of the brands are mixed and matched. Now I'm old enough to know better but for some reason it never occurred to me until now that a #14 iron of one brand might not be a #14 of another.

So comparing brands, and I think I'm seeing eight different brands across mostly France and Germany with at least one iron being from Zurich, I for the life of me can't figure out how they formulated sizes on these. No two brands seems to be the same. I'm a bit flustered and confused now and a bit happy I fell onto a complete set of #0 to #18, yes there is a size #0.

Anyhow if anybody knows some history behind the sizing of these tools I'm really intrigued.

BDA

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2013 9:12 pm
by amuckart
Greetings all,

I am rebuilding a pair of Marshall bell knife skivers and I'd like some advice.

Since I have two identical machines I plan on setting one up to do chrome tanned leathers and the other to do veg, which is what I mostly work with.

I will need to get new knives, sharpening stones, and feed wheels for both machines but I'm not sure what types of sharpening stones and feed wheels to get.

Can anyone give me suggestions? I know that I need a steel wheel for veg tan, and a stone one for chrome, but they come in a bewildering array of grits and pitches.

Thanks.

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Wed Mar 06, 2013 2:05 pm
by farmerfalconer
Quick Question:
From the pics of square sewing awls I have seen the tips look as if they have an actual blade on the tip like a tiny mortising chisel. is this correct. If so that means your actually cutting a hole, not just stretching one right?

Is are the square awls correct for 18th c. ?

Thanks a lot!
Cody

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Thu Mar 07, 2013 3:30 am
by das
Cody,

Yes exactly, "square" stitching awls' points cut slits like this: I I I I I I I I I I, not holes like: o o o o o o.

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Fri Mar 08, 2013 1:21 pm
by farmerfalconer
Thanks.

Cody

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 8:46 am
by kemosabi
Thought this might be an amusing and useful distraction, so I lifted a photo from the old workbench posted in "tools for sale" and attempted to identify the tools.

For the sake of accuracy, please feel free to correct any mistakes and help fill in the blank ones.
15960.jpg


#5 at first glance looks like a sole plane, but close inspection shows no opening or blade at the top.

Cheers,
-Nat

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 10:21 am
by dw
1) rhan or welt file

5) tool/wrench to loosen peg awl

10) peg knife

Tight Stitches
DWFII--HCC Member

[center]Without "good" there is no "better," without "better," no "best."
And without the recognition that there is a hierarchy of excellence in all things, nothing rises above the level of mundane.[/center]

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 12:49 pm
by kemosabi
Updated... Thank you.
#6 is an odd critter. the "T" handle looks like it's designed for pulling. Maybe a channel tool?
15962.jpg

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 1:19 pm
by janne_melkersson
1 Götz call the tool edge cutter or randmesser in German

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Fri Apr 05, 2013 1:26 pm
by janne_melkersson
6 is a hammer for nails in the heel area after the last has been pulled out. At least that is what I have seen it been used for

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 5:35 am
by dw
Janne,

I believe you're right about #1. It very well could be a rhan/welt knife. It's hard to see in the photo...looking closer it appears to have a cutting guard at the very end of the tool.

I have a very old rhan file that has the same shape, however, right down to the handle.

Tight Stitches
DWFII--HCC Member

[center]Without "good" there is no "better," without "better," no "best."
And without the recognition that there is a hierarchy of excellence in all things, nothing rises above the level of mundane.[/center]

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Sat Apr 06, 2013 8:42 am
by janne_melkersson
Dw,
I have an old Berg edge cutter/rand knife that looks the same as #1. It as you said hard to see on the photo.
In English I would call it edge trimmer because it is used for trimming all kinds of edges such as in soles, welts, around the heel......In Swedish it is called a pusher that trim the edges, one word though "frånfällare" Puhser because you push it away ffrom you.

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Wed Apr 10, 2013 2:42 pm
by kemosabi
Thank you DW and Jan for the input on this.
Much appreciated.

-Nat

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Fri May 17, 2013 8:07 pm
by dw
Cody,

Here's a quick two photos of the awl I use to do the "Hasluck heel seat hitch."

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Tue May 21, 2013 10:15 am
by farmerfalconer
Okay. Thats a pretty tight curve. I guess bristles are a must? What did you make the awl from?

THanks for posting this.

Cody

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Tue May 21, 2013 3:24 pm
by dw
farmerfalconer wrote:Okay. Thats a pretty tight curve. I guess bristles are a must? What did you make the awl from?

THanks for posting this.

Cody
I made the awl from another awl that I had broken the tip off of. If I recall correctly, I heated the tip of the awl, bent it and then heated it again and quenched it. Nothing scientific...I think I got lucky because it is near perfect--not brittle but not subject to bending.

I do use and advocate bristles...when the tip of a nylon bristle hits the side of the hole or the surface of the lining as it is being fed, it tends to deflect slightly and follow the path of least resistance. Usually that's the hole. When a steel bristle hits the same spot it tends to balk.

I have used steel bristles for inseaming--both the great old fine diameter soldered bristles that Geotz used to carry and hand made guitar wire steel bristles. But particularly around the heel where you're stitching especially blind, I really appreciate the nylon bristle.

Each to his own, however. At the end of the day when we get done sweeping up the scraps, if the work is clean and tight...it doesn't really matter that much how you got there.

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Fri May 24, 2013 1:19 pm
by farmerfalconer
Well I just got some 8 inch boars bristles for the first time and needed something to do so I tryed it and it was pretty easy. Thanks for showing me how.

Cody

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Wed Aug 21, 2013 9:10 am
by anakim
Hello:

Just want to say thank you to everyone for providing all this information. I am still on page 7 poring over things. You people making or adjusting your own tools are really cool and I just wish I had realised earlier in life that this is my thing. I am a real beginner, just now acquiring my first tools. I live in the south of Spain and am just about as poor as they are here, at this point, so acquiring tools is difficult and I must choose carefully. So far I have bought stuff here, as everyone knows they have a shoemaking industry. But wish I had read a bit more about quality and where best to get stuff before randomly buying. My hammer at least had the edges finished off nicely to start with, but don't know about its overall quality. Luckily my boyfriend has a shop full of carpentry tools so perhaps I can make a better handle and fix my crappy awls. (The only problem is he keeps promoting the use of bandsaws, routers and what-have-you to make my job easier - lol!)

I have not tried harder to get information here, because most of it seems sadly not to be the kind of shoemaking I'm interested in. There is one guy making beautiful, bespoke stuff in Barcelona (far from me), but most of the others down here work for Manolo Blahnik or whatever (small and exclusive but still factory-ish, as far as I know). There is still a shoemaker in the square nearby with lasts and tools (none of which he will sell me) although he has quit actually making anything (due to lack of demand) as of a few years ago. Totally unhelpful about things, cause he thinks the art is dead and I'm weird.

If anyone has suggestions about getting tools over here (eg maybe I should go to Germany), or what is a good approach, that would be most welcome.

Ana Kim

Re: Tools of the Trade

Posted: Thu Dec 05, 2013 7:57 pm
by dmcharg
G'day All,
I remember ages ago there was a discussion on surfaces to skive on. Old truck window glass and fronts of old T.V.s among them. Recently I was in an 'Op shop' (Opportunity or Thrift shop in other places), and they had a number of domed 'orphaned' glass pot lids. All with substantial handles in the middle, but I thought the hole underneath could be worked around. I checked them all and, by tapping on the glass with my knuckle, was hopefully able to select the one with the thickest glass.
DSCN8856.JPG
Unscrewed the handle at home and was pleasantly greeted by a small hole, even though the handle was also a steam vent.
DSCN8859.JPG
Sits across my lap and does a very sweet job.

This is approx. 1mm thick kangaroo hide.

DSCN8860.JPG

Cheers
Duncan