Tools of the Trade

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luckyduck

Re: Tools of the Trade

#1726 Post by luckyduck » Tue Jan 03, 2012 7:13 am

Paul K.

Thanks for the confirmation, I'll order them up. Yes, I'm thinking the stretch to fit, resole, condition and restore the finish will not be cheap.

Tom O.

Red Head is the other style I was looking at. I used the Mallory leg ones at Lisa's and they are nice.

Thanks again.

PaulO

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1727 Post by homeboy » Tue Jan 17, 2012 7:01 am

Rick,

Here's the stitch prick I was talking about over on the "outsole" section:
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1728 Post by romango » Tue Jan 17, 2012 8:46 am

Thanks Jake. Do you place the flat edge against the upper and then roll down or is it more of a gouging movement? Your marks all look so even and I have had a hard time achieving that look.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1729 Post by homeboy » Tue Jan 17, 2012 10:10 am

Rick,

Just place the flat edge up against the vamp, stick the point into the awl hole, and "flick" the tool away towards the edge. Seems like Dee-Dub has a video describing this technique. Take a look at the Cinema section.

I've seen people do this with a common screwdriver also. Except the action is just a pressing down motion.

I'll check and see if there is a video showing this.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1730 Post by dave » Thu Apr 12, 2012 10:12 pm

Hi Everyone,
This will be my first attempt at posting a picture so wish me luck!

I was visiting my hometown last week (Endicott, NY) and had an opportunity to peruse the antique stores for tools. Endicott was once the home of Endicott Johnson Shoes and they employed over 19,000 people in their operation. I came across lasting pliers, awls, nail pullers and the like but there was one piece I can't identify. I bought it in a lot of other items. Any insights on what this tool is for specifically:
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1731 Post by dave » Thu Apr 12, 2012 10:18 pm

Here is an additional angle. Any insights are appreciated!
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1732 Post by jesselee » Thu Apr 12, 2012 11:36 pm

David,

That is a sole plane. It works like a wood plane but is for trimming the soles. They were made in various sole iron thicknesses. It takes some practice to learn how to use one. You must keep the blade razor sharp and the opening ajusted correctly so you don't gouge the soles.

Cheers,

JesseLee

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1733 Post by dearbone » Fri Apr 13, 2012 5:24 am

David, i have one a little different,It is a sole plane/trimmer as Jesse Lee said but without the blade.

Nasser

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1734 Post by dave » Fri Apr 27, 2012 12:29 pm

Hi Jesse and Nasser,

Thanks for the ID work! Looks like I made a good find because I I did a web search for these and the only one I found was an earlier post on the the Colloquy!

My apologies for the lag time in extending my thanks. Your time and effort is appreciated!

gordon_crighton

Re: Tools of the Trade

#1735 Post by gordon_crighton » Tue May 08, 2012 3:31 am

Hi All. This is my first attemped at making a crimp Break, i think it works allright but i have only made 1 boot so far, would anyone like to add their thought on it, because it pivot at the end instead of the top coming straight down like a brought one:
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If this post is in the wrong spot please move it.
Thanking you for your time
Cheers Gordon

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1736 Post by 1947redhed » Tue May 08, 2012 10:21 am

Your crimp break appeals to my inner tool junkie.
How about a view from the top down inside the double base that receives the levered crimp board?
Georgene

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1737 Post by jesselee » Tue May 08, 2012 12:00 pm

Gordon,
Looks like you have the principle down, but why would you need one for vamps? Crimp breaks were strictly used in high production factories for full cut Wellingtons.

Cheers,

JesseLee

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1738 Post by gshoes » Tue May 08, 2012 12:21 pm

Jesse,

Thats a good question. Thanks for asking it. I have been scratching my head feeling too stupid to ask. I have never seen anyone use one before.

Geri

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1739 Post by jesselee » Tue May 08, 2012 12:48 pm

Geri,

I don't even use one in my shop. I could get it out if I wanted to. I only make full front boots and can crimp a 4/5 oak tanned front in under 10 minutes (average is 6 minutes).
The crimp breaks became popular during the Civil War and gave an advantage so a boot front could be stretched on the 'cramp board' (19th century term from the CW era) in under 2 minutes for mass production.
Personally I love the old crimp breaks. I can see one being used for some modern leathers, as folks are reinventing the wheel crimping stuff they never used in the 19th century and how leather is stretched to the max today, unlike back in the heyday of boot making.

Cheers,

JesseLee

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1740 Post by dmcharg » Tue Aug 14, 2012 12:30 am

G'day All,
Sorry I've been so quiet for so long.

These are some tools I bought recently in a nearby town here in Victoria, Australia. They have a different shaped handle to what I'm used to ( which is fairly rectangular with one top edge rounded off ). Thought Marcell might find some of the edging tools names interesting.
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A lot of them are stamped 'IRING". The fudge wheel at the far right has a clip that swings out so you can change the wheel. I thought this quite a nice idea, but was lamenting the lack of any other wheels in the leather bag I bought the tools in. A bit later, as I picked it up to, I felt and heard a slight movement. What I thought was a decorative line ( I have another tool with a small handle and a fine incised line) turned out to be a two part handle with two more wheels inside.
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The first of the edging tools has this stamp on it
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And Marcell, here's some names for you..

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out of time


Cheers

Duncan

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1741 Post by dmcharg » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:59 pm

Also, I've designed a fume cabinet and now finished it and tried it out. I had been using one I'd made out of card board (sort of a tunnel with an extractor fan at one end, and a hole in the top at the other end for doing the gluing), but it was a bit uncomfortable to reach into, and a bit dark. OK quite dark. A gentleman I know suggested putting a clear perspex top on it to make it brighter. And so began a lot of thinking and designing.

The finished article is plywood;
2 floors, bottom one 6mm ply, top one 10-12mm ply making a sturdy work surface.

The wall is 3mm ply cut so the outer layers' grain runs across the pieces. this allows the ply to bend around the 20cm radius corners on the 'floors'. It took 2 lengths plus a couple of fill in pieces to get all the way around.

I measured the diameter of the fan's intake and worked out the area (3.14159 x radius squared), then did the same with a 21mm spade bit to find out how many holes I should drill to equal the fan. The reason for this is that I wanted to be sure that I did not exceed the fans intake size and therefor not get equal vacuum over the whole surface of the work area.
There is enough space for several pairs of shoes.

I then bent and nailed as I went, the wall to the work 'floor', then inserted the base 'floor' and nailed it in place 5mm up from the bottom edge so that it will be easier to sit flat on the table.

A frame was put in the top for the perspex to sit on.

Two rails were mounted on the front and a door sprung with elastic put between. This means that the door is as closed as it can be at all times (coming up from the bottom because glue fumes are heavier than air) , and when you remove your arms, it closes to around an inch from the top so the fan doesn't have to work too hard to keep a flow of air moving through.

The exit is mounted in a sponge edged board and is placed in a sash window.


Enough blab, here are the pics.
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This is the door in action, looking through the clear top.
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1742 Post by romango » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:34 pm

Duncan - Wow, totally sweet!

The curved walls are quite artistic. You have gone the extra percent to capture almost all fumes.

I figure my design gets about 95% (based on my nose meter).
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Can I ask where you acquired your squirrel cage fan and motor? I have one that has similar dimensions but it overheats after about 15 minutes and shuts down.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1743 Post by dmcharg » Thu Aug 16, 2012 10:40 pm

At a swap meet I'm afraid, Rick. It also gets very hot, so, if you look at the middle pic. you'll see a small clip on desk fan pointing at the motor (the silver fume pipe was moved in between the two so it would be easier to see the fan. Normally it goes over the top of the squirrel cage, giving a direct line for the desk fan's breaze. All the masking tape stuck on the 'cage' is because it wasn't air tight. Will silicone it at some stage.). This is sufficient to keep the motor down to slightly warm to the hand.
It is possable to get heat conducting silicone and alluminium heat sinks from electronics shops, but I haven't shelled out for that yet. The fan seems to work well.

The curved walls served several purposes. It reduced the amount of joinery and increased ridgidity, and hopefully reduces the amount of turbulence in the 'corners', raising efficiency. And with the springy door, can't smell a thing Image

Hope this helps

Cheers
Duncan

bj_goodman

Re: Tools of the Trade

#1744 Post by bj_goodman » Fri Aug 17, 2012 7:23 am

The fume hood is very neat. I do have a suggestion and a caution. Most commercial fume hoods draw feed air from the operators position and force the "clean" air over the work surface and out up a stack. This does a couple of things, It does not allow any fumes to escape into the work space and keeps the fumes out of the motors. Many cement fumes are explosive and drawing them over a non explosion proof motor is a disasterous fire waiting to happen. Pushing air is also easier than suction so your motors may run cooler.
I don't want to be Mr. doom and gloom, but think the very reason we build fume hoods is the reason we should be exploring alternative solvent based materials. When I use cements I place a box fan at my side and blow the fumes across my work area out an open door....which only works until winter.
Just a couple of thoughts.
Brian

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1745 Post by amuckart » Fri Aug 17, 2012 5:10 pm

Duncan,

That's a lovely piece of work which is not at all surprising coming from you.

Given that you need airflow rather than vacuum for fume extraction, I'd wager more holes, or even a mesh 'floor' in the unit would save your motor a lot of work by making the air easier to move.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1746 Post by dmcharg » Fri Aug 17, 2012 8:37 pm

G'day Brian and Alasdair,
The motor is isolated from the flow of air and fumes (this is one of the reasons the motor gets hot. Conventional fans are drawing air over the motor in the course of operation. Larger motors often have a built in fan). It gets very hot on it's own regardless of whether it's attached to anything. When it was in my cardboard tunnel version, it had so much open space the drawing breeze was very weak (and the fan still got hot without external cooling.)
This set up also draws the air from my position, and draws it over the work.
What I was meaning about vacuum; I suppose it would be clearer describing it as an equal drop in pressure in the between floor space, therefore producing an equal draw of air through each of the holes. If the area is too open, the fan is able to draw it's quota of air from the area closest to it, having a lower draft at the furthest points of the cabinet.( This is also why I have the round corners, to reduce the possibility of 'dead' areas. To check the characteristics of your cabinet, put a smoky wick on the end of a fine stick, so your arm doesn't affect air flow and move it slowly over the whole interior of your cabinet ).
I noticed this happening with an earlier, open topped, high side walled, design. I had a chicken wire mesh work surface, and glued objects, when placed near the front, would smell. I placed a layer of hessian (burlap) over the mesh, and the slight resistance produced an equal draw over the whole area greatly improving it.
This, probably, wouldn't be so much of a problem with my new one (having a small variable opening right at my hands), but having an even flow over the whole area should create even drying times.
I agree with you, Brian, on the problems with the glues we use. I'm using where possible, latex based contact glue, but I haven't found anything that will stick soleing rubber on securely enough that isn't toxic. [img]http://www.thehcc.org/forum/images/old_smilies/sad.gif"%20ALT="sad[/img] Any suggestions out there?

Cheers
Duncan

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1747 Post by sir_simon_eyre » Mon Aug 20, 2012 9:21 pm

My most-used knives. All three are 20th-century tools.
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1748 Post by sir_simon_eyre » Mon Aug 20, 2012 9:28 pm

(Message edited by sir_simon_eyre on August 20, 2012)

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1749 Post by gshoes » Tue Oct 02, 2012 11:18 am

I need some help identifying an item that I just bought. This item was described as a wooden and ivory "What Not".

I think that it is used in rope making or maybe thread making, but I am not certain.

I was hoping that this group could help me.

It appears to be missing one screwed in eye hook and there is already an empty hole that would make the third hook equal distant from the others.

It is wooden and about 3" in diameter. The flange on the end just leads to the center ivory piece which appear to be solid all the way through the circle of wood. So, there is no empty chamber inside. Inscribed crudely along the wood is "D-5" and "1/5/46 or 1/5/16". The circular designs are inlaid with ivory and bands of straight brass. The perimeter is inlaid in twisted brass threads.

The flange might be used to secure a weight.

Thanks,

Geri

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#1750 Post by gshoes » Tue Oct 02, 2012 5:15 pm

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