Tools of the Trade

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D.A. Saguto--HCC

Re: Tools of the Trade

#76 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Fri Jan 25, 2002 1:13 pm

Lisa & Tex,
I want to see a photo or sketch of these, especially how you re-shape the jaws.

D.A. Saguto--HCC

Re: Tools of the Trade

#77 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Fri Jan 25, 2002 1:17 pm

Dr. Tall,

Good to see you on here again. You know, Camels has that mystical pyramid in the background, do you think they'll work too? Player's Navy Cuts are what I use, or English Ovals for company.

Tex Robin

Re: Tools of the Trade

#78 Post by Tex Robin » Fri Jan 25, 2002 1:17 pm

Al,
I will take some shots. I don't have a digital so it will take a while. Maybe Lisa has one. Gotta get back to the little guys....TR

D.A. Saguto--HCC

Re: Tools of the Trade

#79 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Fri Jan 25, 2002 1:24 pm

Jake,

Yes, you're in big trouble. The top one is the classic "Crispin" cobbler's hammer, but the bottom one is "German" shoemaker's pattern, not French. The French pattern has an s-curve sweep to the long pane on the back. The "German" one just goes out kinda straight. See DW's pix above. I learned last year there is also a Swiss pattern, which is sort of a cross between the two--just as you'd imagine. But, never try to board a plane with one in your carry-on. Mine came to DC in a bright orange "weapons" bag, and had to be reclaimed from US Customs. Man was I blushing.

D.A. Saguto--HCC

Re: Tools of the Trade

#80 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Fri Jan 25, 2002 1:28 pm

Tex & All,

For driving clinch tacks, try a big fat old 1/2 round file. The heads *never* slip with one of those. In fact Barnsley actually sells what they call a "half-round rivet driver", which is nothing but fat old half-round file. They call clinch tacks "rivets" BTW, or we call rivets "clinch tacks", however you want to look at it. "Two peoples separated by a common language...", again.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#81 Post by jake » Fri Jan 25, 2002 1:48 pm

Al,

OOPS! Well, I should have kept my mouth shut if I didn't know for sure. Thanks for setting the record straight. We ALL appreciate your expertise.

Tex,

Yeah, I hear ya. I only use the crispin for driving my 5/8" treaded nails to secure my rubber top lift.

By the way, you're in big trouble too. You said the "C" word (celastic----big grin)!

Dr. Noah Tall

Re: Tools of the Trade

#82 Post by Dr. Noah Tall » Fri Jan 25, 2002 1:53 pm

Hair Saguto,

May I call you DA? There was once an avant garde movement of bohemian shoemakers known as dada-ists. Perhaps you're descended? Half dada, half Italian? but I digress.

Lucky Strikes contain .013 percent Ganges ganja, a little known herb that facilitates celestial harmony and transcendental epiphany. Camels only contain, you know, camel dung. And Navy Cuts or Ovals will only make your upper lip rigid. No good old boy. Sorry. Cheerios.

Noah

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#83 Post by gaid » Fri Jan 25, 2002 3:49 pm

The Swedish Berg lasting pliers seems to have a world wide reputation, they should because they are of very good quality. But have you heard about the Swedish Tors hammer? Not the one the god of the wikings did swing but the one made for shoe/boot making. I have all three sizes of the Bergs pliers but I must say I do appreciate the Tors shoemaking hammer even more. Anybody out there who have tried the Tors hammer?

Proxy posting

Re: Tools of the Trade

#84 Post by Proxy posting » Fri Jan 25, 2002 5:36 pm

26 Oct 1887 Frank Whitcher
Lasting Pinchers ... yep ... wonder if he let his name spelling leak over to the patent??? Claims shoulder above straight side of the hammer head leading to the screw end which goes into the lower jaw of the pincer...oops...pincher.

4 Apr 1871 Alfred Clarke
Improvement on Shoemaker Pincers ... thats more like it. Claims circular hammer with roughened face yet notes that he does not claim screw on hammer head. That feature must have been around awhile

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#85 Post by dw » Fri Jan 25, 2002 5:45 pm

This tool is a hand-made toe bug tool. It is used to pull cotton cord between two lines of stitching and between the vamp and a toe bug backing. This creates the raised beading over the ball of the foot on western boots.

This one is made of a bicycle spoke and the socket that is used in the rim of the wheel. The socket is embedded in a handle and the spoke is screwed into it. Then the end is cut off, filed to a half round cross-section for about an inch and then folded over on itself.
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#86 Post by dw » Fri Jan 25, 2002 6:08 pm

Here we have a collection of awls. On the left are two sewing awls or perhaps heel awls (The 1898 Barnsley catalogue seems to suggest the latter--or maybe continental sewing awls). In any case they are an older vintage awl and not made like these anymore. I use them for general purpose inseaming and the flat curve is especially appropriate for inseaming around narrow toes.

The lone deeply curved awl must be an inseaming awl from the same Barnsley catalogue. I use these for inseaming as well as whipping in the shank.

Next come pegging awls of several variations and sizes. the one on the far right is a square pegging awl, as I recall.

Then, these are not really my specialty but I treasure them all the same, are some "tingles" or "shoe tacks." These were used over and over again, as I understand it. And a shoemaker might only have a dozen or so. These are hand forged but not antiques.

Finally, on the right is a selection of square awls or sometimes called stitching awls. These were and are used for stitching the outseam--welt to outsole, in tother words.
1983.jpg


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Re: Tools of the Trade

#87 Post by dw » Fri Jan 25, 2002 6:10 pm

And here's another mystery tool. This tool has a spatulated end that is slightly curved. I don't know what it is or how it is used.

Anyone...?
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#88 Post by dw » Fri Jan 25, 2002 6:24 pm

Al,

BTW, The 1927 Barnsley catalogue (as reproduced in Salaman) calls Jakes checkered-faced hammer a "Cordwainers" hammer. The "Cripin" had a chekered face alright but the pane/peen was flat and square.

And one other thing (imply I would ever use heel ball will you?!) I would like to quote (from Salaman) a Mr. D.A. Saguto from 1982...

Ahem..."Over here, the term 'Whitcher' is applied to the common lasting pincer....[snip]...The name 'Whitcher' seems to have become a standard term in shoemaker's jargon here for the lasting pincer with squared or rounded hammer." So...neener, neener, neener.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#89 Post by gcunning » Fri Jan 25, 2002 7:20 pm

THIS IS GREAT!
When I bought that shop a year ago there were pieces that I had no clue what they were or did and have had little time to try and figure them out. Since the tool page was started, I have learned of three things I have that I was not sure what they were used for.

D.A. Saguto--HCC

Re: Tools of the Trade

#90 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sat Jan 26, 2002 7:53 am

Janne,

No, show us a picture of Tor's hammer.

D.A. Saguto--HCC

Re: Tools of the Trade

#91 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sat Jan 26, 2002 8:15 am

Deedub,

You're in trouble again Image The hand-forged tacks, are repro 18thc. "tax",
or "lasting tacks", and reusable. "Tingles" is the modern trade name for
the smallest size of "hand-shoe tacks", with clinching wire points, for
nailing [*spit*] the lasting margin and stiffeners to the insole on modern
welted work with nailed-seats--you know, factory stuff Image

Your "mystery" spatula tool is none other than a channel opener for MacKay'd work.
There's a machine [or hand-tool] that slits in from the edge of the sole,
creating a "flap" of grain almost 1/2 wide , then it scores a half-round
groove at the deepest point under the "flap". This tool is for raising the
"flap" [called a "flap" in the catalogues BTW--but you know them]. You do
your MacKay sewing, the feed dog guides on the groove under the "flap", so
the chain-stitches are flush more or less, then you coat the flap and the
opposite surface of the sole with cement, and pound it shut. When MacKay sewing is done well, the "flaps", gooves, etc. on the bottom are more invisible than even hand-stitched soles.

And nanny-nanny-boo-boo to you. All I observed in '82 was, the term "Whitcher pincer" is often used imprecisely "over here" [USA]. *Presicely*, Whitcher's patent, apparently, had to do with pincers with round screw-on hammers [corrugated/checkered faces?]. What part was Whitcher's own innovation, the jury is still out on I guess. Thanks for posting that proxy bit on the pincer patent stuff BTW.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#92 Post by dw » Sat Jan 26, 2002 8:41 am

Al,

I got to tell you though, I rely on you to correct me on these things (of course, as an added benefit it makes *you* look good--nothing wrong with that). Once I see it in writing or write it down myself I usually don't forget. On the other hand, my "off-hand" memory ain't so good anymore (actually it never was)--years of breathin' fumes has left me with only a handful of active brain cells and about half of them are spark retarded. Image

So don't think I don't appreciate it. Now if I can just remember to write down my home address somewhere maybe I can enjoy a hot shower tonight...er, do you happen to know it? Image

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#93 Post by gaid » Sat Jan 26, 2002 8:41 am

Al,
The only photo I have of the Tors hammer is of bad quallity, but here goes
1985.jpg

It is heavier then all other I have seen. That's prevent the hammer from bounce on the last. I don't know how you use the hammer but I was thought that the hammer will make half the job of the lasting............Janne

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#94 Post by gaid » Sat Jan 26, 2002 8:59 am

Al,
I hit the button to early. The hammer make the half of the lasting I said. That's make the hammer to an important tool. The bennefit of Tors hammer beside it is heavier is the ballance of it. I have not counted how many tap with the hammer there is in a pair of shoes, that's why I don't like a hammer who bounce around the shoe..........Janne

D.A. Saguto--HCC

Re: Tools of the Trade

#95 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sat Jan 26, 2002 9:01 am

DW,

Not trying to make anybody look good or bad, but you will ask these things. Besides, don't worry, you're not the museum-weenie. You just make the cool boots, and let me try to catalogue the antique junk Image

BTW, ain't your home The Whispering Pines Sanitarium? Did you get the fruitcake I sent for Christmas? Did they let you keep it, or confiscate it like the one last year, because it had the distinct aroma of Scotch?

D.A. Saguto--HCC

Re: Tools of the Trade

#96 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sat Jan 26, 2002 9:12 am

Janne,

Very cool. It looks like a "German" pattern, with that straight pane, but much more refined. And oh yes, I use the face, and pane, of my hammer for all sorts of tricks while lasting, especially in the seat where you don't really want to pull the quarters down too far, as pincers might, but you want to get a nice close fit. Also, on very stubborn, or exceptionally heavy work, after I last the toe, but before I go any further, I use the pane to actually bend the lasting tacks up straight and inward, which draws the leather even tighter than if I just pushed them over with my thumb. Here I drive the tacks at an outward angle, so knocking them up straight tugs the leather in even tighter than the pincers had it. Afterward I knock the tacks over flat to pin the margin down. Then I use the pane, parallel to the insole, to gently tap the uppers down into the feather underneath, so they'll fit better into that "L" shaped shoulder around the insole. Afterwards, I used the face to tap around the featherline, to better define it, as well as smooth out any minor "lumps" that might be apparent in the toe, after the toe-case [box, puff, lining, whatchacallit] is inserted.

D.A. Saguto--HCC

Re: Tools of the Trade

#97 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sat Jan 26, 2002 9:24 am

PS--I forgot to mention, too, that the pane on most old shoe hammers has been purposefully mushroomed a little [like banging it on something you shouldn't], because as-is out of the box they are too sharp and might damage the leather like hitting it with a dull ax. The pane gets used for "paning" the edges of the soles too, to help close the channel and compact the leather giving a harder edge there; but that's on that hoary old history-stuff with hand-stitched soles. And, don't overlook the hammer handle as a great sole burnishing stick too, to help lay your channels closed, so always keep it clean and smooth. And right you are--bounce is bad--but too heavy-handed with the hammer, and you might pound your insole right out of shape too, if it's still damp. "Everything in moderation..." is my rule.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#98 Post by jake » Sat Jan 26, 2002 9:43 am

Al,

Don't you remember, you sent me the fruitcake!
You sent Dee-Dubb the mustache wax.

I think Dee-Dubb has an opening for a roommate.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#99 Post by gaid » Sat Jan 26, 2002 10:01 am

Al,
-------------------------
And, don't overlook the hammer handle as a great sole burnishing stick too
-------------------------

The hammer I was talking about is the one for lasting. They also did make a special one for bottoming the shoe. It have the same shape and handle but is bigger and heavier. I don't use mine as a sole burnishing stick, I use the special metal tool made for this purpose. Of course "everything in moderation", my experience is that the risk for damaging the shoe is more if the hammer is light because you have to hit harder with a light hammer to achieve the same result as with a heavier ditto and that hit could leave marks on the upper.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#100 Post by jake » Sat Jan 26, 2002 12:03 pm

Janne,

You mean this.......don't ya?
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