Tools of the Trade

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#101 Post by gaid » Sat Jan 26, 2002 1:05 pm

Jake,
That's the one. It seems like yours are made by Barnsley's, they are making pretty good stuff.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#102 Post by dw » Sat Jan 26, 2002 1:51 pm

Image ** Emergency Opinion Alert! **

Janne and Al,

I have no idea how good or how well balanced the Tor is. But it can't hold a candle to my Emil Brinkermann for grace and refinement. (see photo in archive 26-50) It's a pretty heavy hammer. But look at that sweet curve leading to the pane--both top and bottom--and if you could see how gracefully the head narrows from the handle to the face (you have to see it from the top) you'd *want* it. Sorry not selling...ever!

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#103 Post by gaid » Sat Jan 26, 2002 2:57 pm

Al,
Hevreka! I had a photo of the tripple Berg pliers.
Image
I know, I have to do something about my photo technique

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#104 Post by gaid » Sat Jan 26, 2002 3:09 pm

1988.jpg

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#105 Post by dw » Sat Jan 26, 2002 6:34 pm

Well, I'm about done for a while..or maybe not...but here's another series of photos from my shop.

This first tool is a non-traditional tool. I call it a "hacking" knife because I use it the same way I have always used my handmade hacking knife--to breast heels and to rough shape them after building them up. My homemade knife was made from an old industrial hacksaw blade. I added a handle (just one) and away I went. My teacher had one just like it. Sharp...so sharp you can pare a square block of hardened and compressed heel layers into nearly the final shape with just a few strokes. First time I saw Mike Ives do it I thought it was both incredible and that he would surely take his leg off. I've been doing the same thing though for nearly all of my career and it's not that dangerous. But when I ran across this knife I bought it immediately--for students and my not-so-steady old age.

This tool is of Swedish manufacture and can be bought through Lee Valley Tools--a woodworkers dream catalogue.
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#106 Post by dw » Sat Jan 26, 2002 6:45 pm

I tell you, I love my digital camera! I finally figured out how to shoot in close-up mode (macro mode) and although the photos I'm posting have been resampled (smaller), in the originals you can literally see the individual fibers of the carpet. Suh-weeet!

Here is a pair of lining plyers although some might call them welt plyers. My teacher did and he used them to level the welt in lieu of using the welt press on a five-in-one.

These are old. I was gifted them, they had belonged to my friends great grand father and they came from Eastern Europe. you can see the hallmark on the handle. So they may very well be 18th century.
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#107 Post by dw » Sat Jan 26, 2002 6:51 pm

This next is a welt mill. I don't use it. But it's a nice collectors item, I suppose. As I understand it the tool was placed on the knee and a stirrup was thrown over it to secure it in place. Then a knife was laid in one of the serrations in such a way as to create a kind of plane. Leather suitable for welting in all ways except thickness was then pulled through and against the edge of the knife which if held firmly would essentially split the leather to a predetermined thickness. Each serration represents a little thicker welt strip. Al might actually use one of these regularly unless he's sneaking off to the back buildings and running his leather through a crank splitter... Image

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#108 Post by dw » Sat Jan 26, 2002 7:03 pm

Speaking of welts here are some welt knives. The one on the left is a Snell and Atherton circular welt knife. I don't have the full scoop on welt knives, and I seem to discover new ways of using it almost daily. But originally it was used to level welt. Most western bootmakers use all three variants pictured to level the rhan (rand) or heel seat. I use the Star welt knife (second from the left) to trim in the shank and around the heel seat. I use the Yankee Welt knives (the two on the right) to trim welt edges and for irregular clean up on the shank and heel seat.

The second photo is a close-up of the Snell and Atherton as well as a front and rear shot of the Star.
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#109 Post by dw » Sat Jan 26, 2002 7:09 pm

Well, I have some sole planes but I think I'll leave them til tomorrow.

This last image is my mystery tool #3. I don't suppose this will baffle many people but tomorrow I'll post another shot of it that will make it clear what this tool is. It's a beauty...
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#110 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sun Jan 27, 2002 5:16 am

DW,

Welt mills are cool, but I don't use the one I beguiled out of Salaman years ago. The dead guys, especially the Brits, used to split their welting down from insole/outsole bellies, and odd bits with this little charm device. I use horse for welts, or Barbour's welting. And, even for leathers that are too thick, I usually wet it and hammer it down to the thickness I want, to toughen it up, rather than splitting away valuable grain-fibers.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#111 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sun Jan 27, 2002 5:19 am

DW,
I won't spoil your suprize, but that one is very obvious Image

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#112 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sun Jan 27, 2002 5:27 am

Jake & Janne,

I know the bottom iron too, but my comments about the using the hammer handle had to do with right after you finish sole-stitching, while the sole's still damp, and you're trying to close-up that channel--the hammer is in your hand already from tapping the edges, so just flip it over and use the handle to rub the sole-side of the channels to help close them. It's faster, with not so much putting down one tool to pick up another, etc. Afterward, you scour the bottom, sand or scrape the grain, ink, and *then* burnish with the heated iron tool for the final finish of course.

Jake--Sorry about the fruitcake.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#113 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sun Jan 27, 2002 5:29 am

Janne,

I guess I have the medium and small Berg's only, and am missing the largest size. If you ever find a spare one, you know where it goes Image

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#114 Post by dw » Sun Jan 27, 2002 7:48 am

All,

I too use the hammer handle in just the way you've described. It seems so very natural. But rather than the metal bottom iron (I have one exactly like Jake's) I use a rosewood bottom "iron" that I made. Especially when the sole is just at *that* point, it really burnished the grain. Maybe I'll post a photo of it next week.

BTW, I know it's no consolation but have you looked at the "Berg style" pincers in the Goetz catalog. I have a pair of Bergs and I have four pair of the German knock-offs. Like I said before, there's not a lick of difference in the head nor the angle of leverage between the Bergs and the German mades. You know I'm particular...in this case the only difference I can see is the heavy protruding hinge rivet on the Bergs...and at least one of the German makes has that too. The largest Schein is roughly a foot long and has jaws three-quarters of an inch wide. If you're actually going to *use* these tools, well it's just a thought...

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#115 Post by RileyCraig » Sun Jan 27, 2002 8:58 am

DW,

Where would a person find a bottom iron for burnishing? I, like most everyone, close the channel with the hammer handle, and I've been doing the burnishing with a rounded handle off an old tack hammer. I'm usually satisfied with the outcome, but it IS a lot of work.

Regards,

Riley

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#116 Post by jake » Sun Jan 27, 2002 9:19 am

Anyone,

Purchased these pincers probably three years ago from Barnsley & Sons. Use them exclusively around the toe and heel. They look like a Berg style, but on the "head" is stamped W.-Germany. Are they Berg sytle pincers? My point being, you can still purchase this type of pincer, which is some reassurance of obtaining quality tools.
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#117 Post by dw » Sun Jan 27, 2002 9:28 am

Riley,

Well, Barnsley makes a beautiful bottoming iron...as Jake's photo above would indicate. But IMNSHO (in my not-so-humble opinion), it's dern sure not a panacea as far as making the work easier or faster. You're gonna be doing the same thing with the bottoming iron as you're already doing with your hammer handle. The bottoming iron may be a bit smoother than the hammer handle but how much is gained by that (unless the handle is dead rough) I can't say.

Either way it's *still* a lot of work.


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Re: Tools of the Trade

#118 Post by gaid » Sun Jan 27, 2002 11:15 am

Al,
I too use the hammer handle to close the channel, or at least I did until I bought the 50 year old sanding machine which is now in my shop. On the shaft there is a brass wheel with some sorts of threads made for this purpose and it works quite well. Then I heat up my metal burnisher just a bit and the sole and heel will be burnished. The damp cloth Jan P mentioned is one of those small "secrets" which make the job "easy". Since I started using it making glossy bottoms is fun.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#119 Post by dw » Sun Jan 27, 2002 6:00 pm

These are edge or sole planes. Not much used anymore what with the advent of the finisher and trimmer attachments but interesting as collector's items.

The one on the left (also shown in the first close-up) not only trimmed excess off the edge of the sole, it shaped that edge as well--combining the function of the sole plane and the edge iron in one tool. I infer that it would have been heated. I think it is a Horn.

The second from the left is a Barnsley of fairly recent vintage (shown in the second close-up). And the one on the right is a Snell and Atherton which functions essentially the same as the Barnsley but has spokeshave handles.
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#120 Post by dw » Sun Jan 27, 2002 6:04 pm

Here's the photo of last night's "mystery' tool in its full glory. A size stick. Barnsley, boxwood, virtually unused. Notice the dime laying next to it.
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Re: Tools of the Trade

#121 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sun Jan 27, 2002 6:49 pm

Riley,

Unless you're heating all your kit-irons [forepart irons, waist irons, etc.], I, personally, wouldn't bother with a bottom, or shank iron. If you're only burnishing damp leather for a bottom finish, a deer shank bone, or good polished hardwood long-stick does just fine. The iron tools for finishing are intended to be used heated, with heat-reactive inks, gums, and other specialized finishing agents. Save the bucks, shoot a bambi Image

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#122 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sun Jan 27, 2002 6:51 pm

Jake,

They are the "Swedish" pattern, but nothing is a Berg, but a Berg--they're magical.

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#123 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sun Jan 27, 2002 6:55 pm

Janne,

A picture of that gizmo would be helpful. You lucky devil.

RileyCraig

Re: Tools of the Trade

#124 Post by RileyCraig » Sun Jan 27, 2002 7:14 pm

D. w., and D. A.,

Thanks for the response regarding burnishing irons. Guess I'll just continue to use the tack hammer handle...a deer shank bone, eh? That's interesting!

Best regards,

Riley

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Re: Tools of the Trade

#125 Post by D.A. Saguto--HCC » Sun Jan 27, 2002 7:28 pm

Riley,

Deer shank bones are very "traditional", but the English red deer are a bit larger than the scrawny Eastern White-tails. Maybe an Elk shank? Anyway, whatever, give it a good polishing with 400 grit wet/dry, and through use it will get even more polished.

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