Top patterns/stitching

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#351 Post by ccs » Fri Jan 21, 2011 7:13 pm

If you just want a needle with an eye at the pointy end, you could try a largish sewing machine needle.

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#352 Post by artzend » Fri Jan 21, 2011 8:05 pm

Diane

Are you using a leather needle? Try a larger size but that is the only shape needle to use. If not get a diamond shaped handsewing awl in the size you want.

Tim

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#353 Post by piper » Sun Jan 23, 2011 3:41 pm

Yeah, I need a better awl. It takes so long to order things and wait for them to arrive. I managed pretty well with my homemade stitching awl. I was able to finish the stitching anyway.

I was surprised my sewing machine was able to work on the leather. I have an old Pfaff, not a special machine. I used a heavy-duty needle and no thread and manually turned the wheel to make the holes. Perhaps I could try with thread next time.

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#354 Post by romango » Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:05 am

Here is a little picture tutorial on how my Chelsea uppers go together.
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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#355 Post by romango » Tue Jan 25, 2011 10:06 am

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#356 Post by paul » Tue Jan 25, 2011 12:50 pm

Cool Rick,

Thank you very much. That's very generous of you.

I'll spend some time studying it later.

Back to the bench,
Paul

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#357 Post by elfn » Sat Aug 11, 2012 5:44 pm

Question . . .
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The designer is using the leather not being struck through as a design element. Has anyone done anything similar but having the lining be the accent?

What I'm asking is, can the lining and the upper be constructed together in such a way that the lining acts as part of the design? Rather than having the lining and the upper constructed as separate units and united at the collar, can the toe be built as one unit, lined and skived, set under the forefoot (apologies for not looking up the correct part name) so the lining of the forefoot shows? Ditto for where the next piece fits together? Marry the lining and the upper and construct it as if it's an unlined shoe so the lining color (say RED), shows around the edge of the upper (say BLACK)?

Thanks. Seeing what other people do sparks my creative "what if" core.

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#358 Post by romango » Sat Aug 11, 2012 6:44 pm

Why not? Your example (above) is just an oxford with unfinished edges.

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#359 Post by elfn » Sun Aug 12, 2012 7:18 am

I've got some lovely red goat . . .

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#360 Post by dw » Thu Jun 13, 2013 7:25 am

I may have posted this before but it's such an interesting technique...and I've refined it a little...and it just works so well.

I'm currently making a pair of Balmoral shoes for a customer. He ordered alligator facings and a calf vamp/golosh with a folded edge.

So, after I had made the fitter's models and gotten them approved, I designed the standard and the patterns. I cut the vamp pattern out of manila folder stock making notations for folding and seam allowances. Cut this pattern accurately.

Then I made an exact copy of that pattern out of heavy duty manila folder. Next, using a pair of dividers, with a sharp pencil mounted in one leg, I marked a line one millimeter in from the top edge (the folding edge) of the golosh. This distance is roughly equal to the thickness of the calf I needed to fold. Then, carefully, carefully, I trimmed that one millimeter margin away.

Now I have a folding pattern.

Next, I ran some 3M Book tape along the edges on both sides of the folding pattern. The tape is thick enough to protect the manila folder long enough to fold the edges of both the left and right vamp. Hammer or rub the tape...esp. close to the edge of the pattern...to make sure it is firmly adhered and then, using some fine sandpaper (220) lightly scratch/rough the surface of the tape.
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When I cut the leather I added a 1/4" folding allowance. I skived this margin wider than the allowance, say 3/8" wide.

Place a swath of rubber cement on the tape on both sides of the folding pattern. Allow it to dry. Place a swath of rubber cement along the skived side of the vamp/golosh.

While the rubber cement on the leather is still wet, position the folding pattern on the leather aligning the pattern so that it matches the outline of the leather perfectly. This should result in the folding edge of the pattern being perfectly place--one mm shy of where the leather will fold.

When the cement has had time to dry, make relief cuts along inside curves. Do not cut all the way to the edge of the folding pattern--allow at least two millimeters clearance. Then brush more cement on the edge of the pattern and on the leather. Allow to dry.

I like to fold leather while it is damp or even wet. Turn the vamp over and apply stretching fluid or a mix of alcohol and water to the folding margins. Let that soak in for a minute or two and then, with a paper towel, pat it dry on both the grain side and the pattern side.

With the grain side of the vamp down, use a modeling tool to lift the folding margin upright so that it is at right angles to the workspace surface. Because some of the rubber cement stuck to the very edge of the folding pattern the leather should remain upright.

All that remains is to gently pull/push the leather over and down to stick to the folding pattern. Hammer gently and allow to dry.
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When dry, the leather may be gently released and the folding pattern removed. The leather can then be easily re-folded to the exact same position it was in when it was stuck to the folding pattern. Hammer gently and it's done. The pattern can then be flipped and the same procedure done with the other vamp.
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Why do it this way? It's an easy way to fold leather edges precisely and cleanly. Complex curves and reverse curves are done easily and quickly. No unsightly flat spots, no wobbles, and both vamps will be exactly the same size and shape.
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And without the recognition that there is a hierarchy of excellence in all things, nothing rises above the level of mundane.

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Re: Top patterns/stitching

#361 Post by dw » Mon Nov 09, 2015 6:47 am

dmcharg » Mon Nov 09, 2015 2:47 am wrote:Followed your link too, DW. Love the attention to detail :)
And Alexander, nice job.
Cheers
Duncan
Duncan,

Well yes, aside from being a control freak, God (and the devil) is in the details. Either way...paying attention is critical.

This technique can, as mentioned be used for topline bead as well. One of the reasons I use this technique is that...especially on tight or complicated curves...forcing a straight bead to "turn the corner" creates a tension that will tend to make it open back up a little. And it will also force the upper into a non-flat configuration. Both of those issues work to not only make sewing harder but to leave the exposed bead edge less than uniform width.

And I don't like to see that...if I set out to expose 1mm of bead, I want it to be 1mm all the way around.

I understand that a really skill maker could fold edges uniformly...or at least so you couldn't see the irregularities from the highway. But at my best, my slowest and most careful, and even with lines made by silver pens, and other visual aids, when I fold freehand I see flat spots and corners that are wider or tighter than on the corresponding quarters of the other side or shoe, and it bothers me.

I don't know whether it's poor technique or hyper-critical perception.

In any case, if you start off with precision techniques...paying attention to detail, IOW...and build on them, you more often than not end up with precision.

And every once in a while, if you're lucky and hold your tongue just so, you catch a glimpse of the divine.
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Without "good" there is no "better," without "better," no "best."
And without the recognition that there is a hierarchy of excellence in all things, nothing rises above the level of mundane.

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