sewing machines

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Re: sewing machines

#901 Post by islandpiper » Wed Jul 10, 2013 9:08 am

I have been looking at these......seemingly affordable machines. Do any of you have one, or experience with them? Thanks!! piper


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kiBJWpTYHw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiBhQ92KOao

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Re: sewing machines

#902 Post by dw » Wed Jul 10, 2013 10:23 am

islandpiper wrote:I have been looking at these......seemingly affordable machines. Do any of you have one, or experience with them? Thanks!! piper


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7kiBJWpTYHw

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FiBhQ92KOao
It's just a variation of a patcher. and a cheap knock-off at that, IMO.

It's great for repairing shoes, not so good for the fine, elegant, precision work necessary when making brand new--cordwaining as opposed to cobbling, IOW.

BTW, the comments on the second video are good examples of rampant internet ignorance...in my opinion.

Just saying' :2cents:
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Re: sewing machines

#903 Post by hidesmith » Sat Aug 24, 2013 9:27 am

Well, it's been a while, and I'm not sure I'm doing this correctly - but here goes . . .

I just bought a Pedersen hand operated stitcher (Junker and Ruh copy) and am having difficulty operating it. It came with only one needle and one bobbin (is it called a bobbin?). I had difficulty moving the arm back and forth, so I downloaded the manual and tried to figure the machine out. The manual advised that I investigate the rack that drives the bobbin, so I did. In so doing, I changed the timing. I replaced the pinion gear so the bobbin hook was just next to the needle as it moved down, which made sense to me. The bobbin thread seems very tight to me, but changing the tension is beyond me - even with the downloaded manual - which doesn't seem all that helpful to me. I looked at everything I could find online - youtube, ebay, etc. for anything helpful and am stymied. Are there any sources and resources for the aforementioned item?
Thanks,

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Re: sewing machines

#904 Post by meryle » Mon Sep 09, 2013 5:42 pm

I apologize if this topic has been addressed already, I did search but there is so much information on here!

I want a sewing machine heavy enough to at least mostly stitch side seams on western boots (and do some heavier non-boot-related tasks). A local shop talked me into buying an Adler 373 , which either needs a much bigger needle (a 25 is too big but I have been unable to find a list of suitable needle sizes that would fit) or is hopelessly inadequate. I've been thinking about buying a Cobra 3 or 4 series. Someone else suggested an Adler 105. I'd really appreciate any advice / opinions.

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Re: sewing machines

#905 Post by Arttu » Tue Apr 22, 2014 3:57 am

I recently got a Pfaff 193-5B head from my girlfriends grandfather. He had bought two machines from a shoe factory in the 80's. Apparently this one was used as a backup at the factory and wasn't used much, if at all. There are a few major components missing, including most of the thread tension assembly, bobbin case and bobbin cover slide. I have found places that still sell spares (which I find amazing as the machine dates back to 1957). Getting a motor and building a table for it won't be a problem.

What I'd like to know is, is this a machine that is worth investing in? There is pretty much no information to be found on the internet, but from what I can tell, it's a very simple machine. It has only 3 stitch length and no reverse (this is no problem for me). Does anyone have any experience with these machines?

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Re: sewing machines

#906 Post by lancepryor » Tue Apr 22, 2014 6:23 am

Arttu:

I don't know that specific machine, but I have a Pfaff 941, which appears similar, and it is a very nice machine. If the 193 has a driven top roller, then that is great for closing uppers.

The big questions are: how much will buying the parts cost, what is the condition of the existing machine's parts, and can you find a parts list/detailed assembly/disassembly manual to help you put it all together and fine-tune it? You also want to make sure the available stitch lengths would be appropriate for your application, or make sure this can be changed by exchanging a part.

Also, be aware that the cut out in the table top for the Pfaff is a different size/shape than for most other sewing machines, so be prepared to do some modification of the table top.

I believe there are knock-offs of the 941 now available; depending on the cost of the parts for the 193, those might be alternatives, as would be one of the used Singer models with a driven top roller (236 class?) -- though these latter are more finicky, I think.

You can also use a cylinder bed machine for closing, and I've even seen it done on a flatbed machine, so there are other options, but Pfaff are certainly nice machines.

I have some detailed parts and assembly manuals for the 491, which would likely apply to much of the 193's as well, so if you want them let me know, and I will e-mail them to you.

Lance

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Re: sewing machines

#907 Post by Arttu » Tue Apr 22, 2014 6:56 am

Thanks Lance. Unfortunately the top wheel isn't driven (as far as I can tell). It seems getting the machine up and running would cost around $200. The existing parts seem to be in great shape (there is no play anywhere and everything is smooth). I already have a motor lined up and would be building the table myself (I can use another flatbed machine for spooling).
The oil inside the machine is thick, greasy and sticky, almost factory grease-like. That would support the claim that the machine was never used in the factory. On the other hand it hasn't been used in at least 35 years, so it might just be normal old oil that has dried up.
I found a parts catalog with detailed drawings of all the parts and a pdf copy of the original user manual, so building it back up should be no problem.
The stitch lengths should be around the ballpark for upper work, as it was originally used for that purpose. The stitch lengths can be further adjusted by changing gear cogs under the machine if needed.

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Re: sewing machines

#908 Post by dw » Tue Apr 22, 2014 8:40 am

If you can put it back together for $200.00, it's well worth it. While there may be some machines...such as the 491....that are more advanced, you can't beat the initial investment and I have every confidence that you could sell the working machine for the cost of the rebuild.

BTW, I have a Pfaff post bed machine like the 491 (only difference is the way the post itself is set up) and I have a Singer 136, which is comparable to the machine you inherited. The Singer is my go-to machine...in preference to the Pfaff.
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Re: sewing machines

#909 Post by romango » Mon Apr 28, 2014 10:49 am

There's a great little tutorial on tuning up a Singer 31-15 on YouTube: http://youtu.be/Z1QX4nL65L0

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Re: sewing machines

#910 Post by lancepryor » Mon Apr 28, 2014 12:20 pm

dw wrote:If you can put it back together for $200.00, it's well worth it. While there may be some machines...such as the 491....that are more advanced, you can't beat the initial investment and I have every confidence that you could sell the working machine for the cost of the rebuild.

BTW, I have a Pfaff post bed machine like the 491 (only difference is the way the post itself is set up) and I have a Singer 136, which is comparable to the machine you inherited. The Singer is my go-to machine...in preference to the Pfaff.
DW:

What is it about the Singer that you find makes it preferable to the Pfaff?

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Re: sewing machines

#911 Post by dw » Tue Apr 29, 2014 8:57 am

Don't get me wrong...the Pfaff is a fine machine and built like a tank. But for me it is always a hassle to set the stitch length. I bought a rebuilt, but I spend about ten minutes or more adjusting stitch lengths with the 49x model.

I have the stitch length set at about 10 to the inch for mounting pulls on boots.It is a wonder for that job, sewing through 6 layers of leather and feeding reliably as the presserfoot climbs up and onto thicker sections and back down again.

But trying to set the stitch length to a smaller size invariably ends up with a too small size even though I think I have only adjusted one click. Sometimes trying to then go back to a bit larger length ends up with an SPI longer than the 10 spi I started with. So it's jockeying back and forth until I get what I want...almost more by luck than intent.

The Pfaff also has the screwiest, most arcane system of threading of any machine I've ever run across.

The Singer 136 is a tiny bit prone to skipping if the material isn't held steady and it won't feed up over lumpy seams very well. But if you know that, it's good to go almost immediately. It sews reliably and never needs fussing with.

I understand that the presserfoot driven Singer 236, when properly adjusted, will feed pretty much like the 491...with a better stitch length adjustment. If I could find a completely rebuilt 236 I'd seriously consider selling the Pfaff.
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Sewing Machines

#912 Post by lisahelen » Fri Sep 19, 2014 11:59 am

I have an Artisan 5100 machine, and I am curious if anyone can tell me about their experience with sewing thicker threads on that machine, and also then using a larger needle. A guy at their store said you could use a thread size up to 138, and then the corresponding needle size of between 20 to 22... ?? I am relatively new to all this and not sure of sizes and weights etc.
Thanks!

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Re: sewing machines

#913 Post by homeboy » Wed Sep 24, 2014 6:46 am

Don't have your exact machine, but off the top of my head, I think it will work. I do believe Lisa Sorrell has your same machine. Drop her a line. Sorry I couldn't be more help.

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Re: sewing machines

#914 Post by dw » Thu Dec 11, 2014 9:10 am

Recently I was asked about needles for Singer 31 class sewing machines. I thought I would post the answer here as it helps many people and answers the mission of the Guild which is to "preserve and protect"...and archive.

The Singer 31 class has an adjustable needle bar. So, theoretically and within reason, several needle "systems" work with the machine. The ones I list here, however, worked with all my 31's, over the years, without adjustment of the needle bar or any hassle.

Some needle points...the less common ones...may not be available in all sizes in all systems. I don't know whether this is a matter of manufacturer's designations, stock on hand, or simply serendipity, but as a result, I have and use several different systems and they all work perfectly fine. I doubt that a detailed inspection would reveal any visual differences between them short of size or point.

The needle systems I use are:

Schmetz 134 LR, 135x8 (aka SY 1984, SY 6806, 797 LR) these are mostly (N)arrow (R)everse (T)wist--NRTW
Schmetz 134 R, 135x5, 135x7 (aka SY 1955, 797, DPx5) round points
Schmetz 134 D, 135x8 TRI triangle point
Groz-Beckert 134 R, 135x5, 135x7, (aka DP-5, 797, SY 1955) round point

And if I'm not mistaken...

Schmetz 16x231 SDI (aka 1738 SDI) tri-tip points...also works in this machine.

Of course all of these come in sizes--the diameter of the needle itself. I use a size 14/90 with a size 46 thread for most "dress" work, although some use a size 12/80 with size 33 thread. And occasionally for very fine leathers I'll slip down to a size 10/70.

Needles in minimums of 100 are available at:

Universal Sewing

and

Dunlap Sales

As well, I'm sure, at your nearby NeedleMart... :crackup:
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Re: sewing machines

#915 Post by romango » Thu Dec 11, 2014 11:33 am

DW. I notice you list a couple of round point needles. Are these also suitable for leather work?

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Re: sewing machines

#916 Post by dw » Thu Dec 11, 2014 1:34 pm

romango » Thu Dec 11, 2014 11:33 am wrote:DW. I notice you list a couple of round point needles. Are these also suitable for leather work?
Rick,

First, I forgot to mention that most of the "systems" listed are available from Schmetz, Groz-Beckert and Lammertz.

As for round point needles, you know that every point has a somewhat different effect...some good, some not so much depending on what you want.

For instance, twist points lay the stitches quite nicely and close to the leather. A round point or a tri-tip leaves the stitches more proud.

I'm very fond of narrow reverse twist points simply because I've seen vintage shoes with very fine stitching and it all seems well laid and rope-like (another characteristic of twist points). But twist points are bladed points and bladed points will cut leather. If you're stitching deep into a point on an overlay such as a toe cap, or a filigree inlay that can be a disaster.

So when I'm doing inlays or overlays esp. in fine leathers such as kangaroo, I always use a round point or a tri-tip.
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Re: sewing machines

#917 Post by dw » Fri Dec 12, 2014 9:03 am

PS...Yes, all these points are suitable for leather-work / shoemaking. Naturally some points will penetrate hard-grained and / or thicker leather better than others.

I suspect, for instance, that the tri-tip point (SDI) was invented as a alternative to the round point in those situations where you have a hard grain surface and need accurate, consistent penetration. My own experience, esp. as we move to finer and finer needles, is that round points deflect somewhat.
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Re: sewing machines

#918 Post by dw » Sat Dec 13, 2014 7:21 am

Rick,

Just thought I would post a photo to underscore using a round point needle. This is, IIRC, a size 10 round point and 33 thread. And a while ago... :)
DSC00117.JPG
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Re: sewing machines

#919 Post by romango » Tue Dec 16, 2014 9:19 am

My second decorative stitching project. I ended up using a Schmetz 134LR, size 14 (blade tip) on my Singer 31-20 with size 33 thread, from Lisa Sorrell. The size 14 needle is a little large but it seems to work OK. I'm still trying to locate smaller size needles.

Still lots of room for improvement but I'm pretty happy with the result. It is way better than my first attempt! :beers:
DSC_4988.JPG

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Re: sewing machines

#920 Post by dw » Tue Dec 16, 2014 10:03 am

Nice! Both Universal and Dunlap should have smaller sizes.

It's a matter of personal preference but, for my druthers, I don't think the needle is too large (although a size 12 is better for 33 thread), I think the thread is too small. I prefer a little thicker thread (the difference is almost insignificant)...just because the colour shows up a little better.

(edit: changed "small" to "large")
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Re: sewing machines

#921 Post by homeboy » Tue Dec 16, 2014 6:13 pm

Hey Rick,

I think it looks great! Good job! Keep'em coming.......
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Re: sewing machines

#922 Post by das » Thu Feb 12, 2015 6:42 am

Anybody have a lead on a needle plate for a Singer 11-37, up-the-arm boot back-strapping machine? NOS, or "gently" used is OK.

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Re: sewing machines

#923 Post by tmattimore » Thu Feb 12, 2015 4:16 pm

Ralph's Power Sewing in Denver has an old 11 junker they may part it out. They are in the Denver yellow pages.

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Re: sewing machines

#924 Post by angel » Tue Jan 19, 2016 7:10 pm

Hi all, again.
I'm Angel, an amateur boots maker from Argentina.
First I must apologize for my English. My mother tongue is Spanish.
Though I had never thought of owning my own sewing machine (I had my boots sewn by a shoemaker), I had a rare opportunity of buying an old Singer 29K55 that seems to be in good condition, and I'm delighted about it.
I've been trying it in different materials, and found that it erratically skips stitches. Sometimes one each several, some other times a lot of stitches together.
I've noticed that the shuttle race (I mean the cylindric capsule that holds and moves the lower thread bobbin) has a free movement of about 10º. I can move it with my finger. I'll try to attach a short movie to show, if I find how.
I wonder if this is normal, or it could be the cause of the malfunctioning. And, if it were to be fixed, if it is necessary to change the gears and racks that control the movements.
I've read Al's fantastic advices and instructions in this post, but, as my technical vocabulary is quite narrow, may be he said something on the subject I'm asking and I didn't notice. If so, I apologize.
Thanks in advance,
Angel

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Re: sewing machines

#925 Post by angel » Tue Jan 19, 2016 7:15 pm

The movie didn't show. Maybe it was too heavy (4,5 Mb)
Here goes pics showing extreme positions.
Attachments
Captura de pantalla 2016-01-19 a la(s) 23.11.52.png
Captura de pantalla 2016-01-19 a la(s) 23.11.52.png (141.17 KiB) Viewed 1009 times
Last edited by angel on Tue Jan 19, 2016 7:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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