sewing machines

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farmerfalconer
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Re: sewing machines

#876 Post by farmerfalconer » Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:30 am

Found this machine for sale at an upholsterer in my town which apparently used to have a shoe factory in it. It is a Singer
by the
Hudson Shoe Machine Co.
Haverhill, MA
and the number is 236G100.

Anyone know anything about it? It does run and the guy ran some scraps through it for me.
15212.png

15211.png

\image

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Re: sewing machines

#877 Post by farmerfalconer » Wed Mar 13, 2013 9:32 am

Not sure how I posted that twice.

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Re: sewing machines

#878 Post by lancepryor » Wed Mar 13, 2013 11:46 am

Cody:

I would think that is a Singer post bed? The 236 was their top- and bottom-driven machine, IIRC.

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Re: sewing machines

#879 Post by das » Wed Mar 13, 2013 2:56 pm

I run a 236W100--love the heck out of it.

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Re: sewing machines

#880 Post by farmerfalconer » Thu Mar 14, 2013 5:08 am

What would you consider a fair price for one that runs?

Cody

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Re: sewing machines

#881 Post by das » Thu Mar 14, 2013 10:57 am

Hard call. As-found, unrestored but sewing OK maybe $150-$200 (max) for the head only, depending on condition. If it comes with a good motor and stand maybe a $100 more.

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Re: sewing machines

#882 Post by farmerfalconer » Sat Mar 16, 2013 3:36 pm

Well, its sewing good and has a head and table.
he wants $150 so it sounds fair.

Thanks
cody

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Re: sewing machines

#883 Post by courtney » Mon Mar 18, 2013 2:45 pm

I have a singer 31-20 and the motor sounds really loud and bad, so I changed the motor which turned out to be a enormous pain.

Anyway, somehow I put the belt on too tight and it caused the motor to bind up and smoke and stop, which was really sad.

So, this morning i turned it on and it seems to be working o.k. and not smoking.

Do you think its bad to run it still, gonna catch on fire?

Courtney

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Re: sewing machines

#884 Post by anakim » Fri Apr 05, 2013 1:16 pm

Can anyone tell me what the purpose of the "Head Revolving Bush Friction Spring" is, on a Singer 29K15?
After purchasing a new Head Revolving Bush, since my machine came without one, I can no longer easily fit the friction Spring back on (the new bush washer is probably for a 29K71 and slightly wider diameter than original).
I have left the friction spring off and the machine seems to work perfectly (except what I believe to be an unrelated issue of not getting 5 stitches to the inch yet).
Thanks!
Ana Kim

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Re: sewing machines

#885 Post by eric_e » Fri Apr 05, 2013 3:35 pm

Kim

I have 29-4, which is similar. I'm not a mechanic, and I may be wrong, but:

I found that I could get the spring under the bush washer by loosening up the two screws and taking it off. The washer is slightly tapered - undercut - so the spring fits under the taper. Then, when you tighten the screws back down, the tapered part of the washer bears on the spring instead of the head of the machine. That lets you adjust the friction on the rotating assembly without wearing away the head or cutting a groove in the washer, I think.

Anyway, that's my guess and the way I put mine back together.

It also raises the cylinder slightly and may or may not affect stitch length.

I assume that you have more than 5 per inch and want to get longer stitches?

Eric

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Re: sewing machines

#886 Post by anakim » Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:15 pm

Eric, that's brilliant! Thanks so much! I will try what you say. I wouldnt have guessed where it fit and didn't see any information on it.
Would be wonderful if it gives me longer stitches. I only get about 8 if I do everything just right.

Kim

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Re: sewing machines

#887 Post by anakim » Sat Apr 06, 2013 5:34 pm

I've put the friction spring under the tapered part but I don't see any way to prevent the support washer from tilting up... the part that goes slightly over the friction spring is raised compared to the part that rests on the head. This doesn't seem like a good situation, as it binds when turned, and I can only imagine that causing a lot of wear on the head and washer both. What am I missing? Are my pieces not fitting correctly (highly possible as the washer is new) or is the washer supposed to somehow rest on the thread guide on the opposite side as well?

eric_e

Re: sewing machines

#888 Post by eric_e » Sat Apr 06, 2013 7:13 pm

I revisited this - again, the 29-4 is different - and it looks like the washer is seated flat on the piston, probably the way you had it to start with. Sorry for the misinformation.

Alternately, I was able to get the spring on - after securing the bush washer - by holding it to one side with a screwdriver and then inserting the screw holding the other end. I took some pictures that may help.

Several things affect stitch length, too, and you'll reach a limit you'll have to accept. There are some other posts on stitch length somewhere on the forum, too.
\image

eric_e

Re: sewing machines

#889 Post by eric_e » Sat Apr 06, 2013 7:19 pm

Here are a couple of images, I hope.
15966.jpg
15965.jpg

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Re: sewing machines

#890 Post by anakim » Mon Apr 08, 2013 3:04 pm

Thanks a million for your great help and photos. I got my spring on by bending it a lot with a strong guy's help, but it pushed the washer over so that it bound on the needle bar which would cause unacceptable damage after a time. In the end I've had to leave my spring off. I noticed that after using the washer a little, it leaves a mark on the head significantly wider in diameter than the ring from the original washer. I take it that the spring's function is just to keep the mechanism (foot) from rotating out of position as you sew...?

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Re: sewing machines

#891 Post by das » Tue Apr 09, 2013 4:44 am

The bushing spring on top of the head only applies friction to the rotating feed-foot mechanism so it won’t spin freely, or wander while sewing. Put the top plate on and screw it down fully tight. One end of the spring hooks behind the thread guide upright post. Hook that end and push/hold the screw-eye end of the spring back into position with a large screw-driver, so it rides under the flared lip of the “washer”. While holding the screw-eye in place under tension with your big screw-driver, drop-in the little attaching screw and tighten. Two pairs of hand are helpful, but it can be done single handed.

Stitch length is controlled by the “bell crank lever” assembly. Excessive wear in any of several parts can account for loss of stitch length. Best test: move your stitch-length regulator collar down to its lowest setting and tighten (the thingie with the thumbscrew at the feeder foot). Lower your feeder foot via the lever at the back, but not so far that it touches/rests on the needle plate. Then try to wiggle the feeder foot. If it moves back and forth more than a few thousandths, there’s wear in there. Before you start buying parts and rebuilding the feed-foot system, try taking out the little steel “H” shaped plate that bears on the feeder-foot arm, that the thumbscrew in the regulator collar bears on, and flip it over, or upside down, and test. You might get rid of a lot of slop that way.

If your feeder foot wiggles back and forth, you’ll not only not get reliable stitch lengths, but skipped stitches and frequent broken needles.

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Re: sewing machines

#892 Post by johnl » Fri May 03, 2013 2:16 pm

My little workshop is about as full of stuff as can be. I have a singer post machine mounted on a table (stand). I also have a singer 31-15 head. No room for another table. I would like to be able to switch the two machines on the one table, I can not get to the shop right now, but if I remember correctly, both head are the same width, but the 31-15 is longer. I am thinking about is cutting out the table lengthwise to fit the 31-15, and then, I should be able to use either head with just a change of belts.
I know I can build a platform to slide onto the post machine to act like a table, but it would be nice to be able to use the 31-15 head.
Does anyone see any problem with this?
JohnL

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Re: sewing machines

#893 Post by courtney » Wed May 29, 2013 7:32 pm

I'm picking up my singer 45k25 from the sewing mechanic tommorow, I am excited to use it for the first time.
i had to scour the earth to find a couple parts for it, but I found what I needed.

My question is,
What parts wear out usually? I saw a few parts online and although I dont really have money to spend on parts that I dont need, if I knew feeddogs eventually wear out I might buy one when i see it instead of having to scour the earth again.

So... to be clear,
are there common parts of a sewing machine that often need replacing?

Courtney

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Re: sewing machines

#894 Post by farmerfalconer » Thu Jun 20, 2013 5:28 am

I am now the proud owner of a Singer 236G100 post bed machine. For a while it was stuck on 36spi and just cut the leather but we have it down to 12 spi now ( it should go to 8, we're still working on that) Under the post there is a compartment for oil. basically a tub that all the gears splash around in. Is this common and what type of oil should I use and where could I get it?

Would regular motor oil be okay in a pinch?

Thanks,
Cody

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Re: sewing machines

#895 Post by dw » Fri Jun 21, 2013 5:45 am

Cody,

I don't own a 236 although sometimes I wish for one. That said, I don't think you want to use automotive motor oil, if that's what you mean. I suspect what you want is a light oil...dedicated to use in a sewing machine.

It's too bad but this is one area of the forum that we need more expertise in. Seems like everyone uses a different machine and because they all tend to be old machines, manuals...and even people who have general knowledge about them...are scarce. Nevermind parts.

On my personal website, however, there is a downloadable manual and a parts list for the 236 class machine...if that helps.
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And without the recognition that there is a hierarchy of excellence in all things, nothing rises above the level of mundane.

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Re: sewing machines

#896 Post by farmerfalconer » Fri Jun 21, 2013 10:41 am

Hi Mr. Frommer,

Thanks! I have already downloaded your manuals and they have proved very helpful!

Cody

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Re: sewing machines

#897 Post by Ruth-newbie » Tue Jul 02, 2013 4:13 am

I'm totally new on here and looking for some advice- I'm currently training as a closer and getting my tools together. I have approached Dick Anderson about making a gimping needle for me- he will test this on his machines a 51 post, 110 roller feed and 31 15 (all singer). My question is does anyone know if this means the needle will fit my machine- a singer 29k60. I'm finding it hard/confusing to work out the compatibility between them and specs for my machine..... Any thoughts or help would be greatly appreciated as I'm keen to get going!

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Re: sewing machines

#898 Post by dw » Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:19 am

Ruth,

First, the 31 class flatbed machine and the 51 class post do not use the same needle system. This means that the diameter of the shank of the needles will be different. For a gimping tool to work in machines that take different needle systems, the needle bars have to use a simple clamping system to secure the needle. The 31 class machine does. I vaguely recall that the 51 post might also. But I'm pretty sure that the 110 uses a bored needle bar.

So, the upshot is that as long as the gimping tool fits the 110, Dick may be good to go, but that doesn't mean that the tool will fit every machine. Unless the 29k60 also uses a clamp on the needle bar, your chances of a fit are slim. Dick needs to fit that tool to the 29k60.

Second, the 29k patcher is a walking foot machine. It doesn't feed anywhere nearly as smoothly as the 31 class much less the 110. And a smooth feed is pretty important for smooth, even, consistent gimping.

But beyond that, the shape of the walking foot on the 29 may obscure your view of the edge of the leather, and the leather really needs to be backed with either another piece of leather or a piece of leatherboard, felt or something to keep the cutting edge of the gimping tool from striking the bobbin cover plate. Unless you want to cement those layers together the walking foot feed is going to present a problem especially on narrow surface of the patcher arm.

There are other complications that bear...none of which are insurmountable...but all in all, using a gimping tool in a 29k60 is not a good solution/approach in my estimation. In fact, using a patcher for any kind of closing is kind of like using a pair of pliers instead of the appropriately sized box wrench.

:2cents:
Last edited by dw on Fri Jul 05, 2013 6:14 am, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: surmountable->insurmountable
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Re: sewing machines

#899 Post by jon_g » Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:59 am

Is the 29K60 a patcher? If so I would look for a proper sewing machine first, if you're serious about closing uppers a patcher won't give you satisfactory results.

I have one of Dick's gimping needles and I'm very happy with it.

As I was writing this DW posted his reply and I second his response.

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Re: sewing machines

#900 Post by Ruth-newbie » Thu Jul 04, 2013 9:20 am

Thankyou dw and jon_g for your help-
I chose the machine i have because the machine that the guy I've been learning from uses for gimping is also a manually driven patcher- which is just set up for gimping and works really well. I wanted to keep to a similar set up as I get on with it well and find it easy to control- the needle does seem to be fitted with a clamp system so I think we're going to order some gimping needles from Dick and hope for the best!
The walking foot doesn't really pose a problem in terms of seeing what's going on but if it does prove not to work for whatever reason I guess I'll have to look for a different machine for gimping (I've got a post machine for sewing)- it seems crazy to be finding a machine to fit a needle but we can't find anyone else who makes gimping needles!
Thanks again :)

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