apprenticeships and schooling

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#201 Post by das » Sun Mar 29, 2015 6:00 am

Here's another opportunity for an apprentice shoemaker's position at Colonial Williamsburg.

This time it's a link rather than at pdf simply because if you click on the link you can apply online.

Intern Position

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#202 Post by Footsupport » Wed Apr 01, 2015 8:59 am

Does anyone know of any last making schools or classes in England?

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#203 Post by das » Wed Apr 01, 2015 11:28 am

I would start by asking Bill Bird. Search Bill Bird Shoes. There's also a group of "Independant Shoemakers" in the UK, and if anyone would know I bet they would.

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#204 Post by dw » Wed Apr 01, 2015 5:07 pm

If I'm not mistaken, Carreducker hosted the Independent Shoemakers group last year. They've got a
website here and a weekly blog. they're in London and very focused on helping people get into the Trade. Worth contacting, at least.
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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#205 Post by das » Wed Apr 08, 2015 10:35 am

[center]
Colonial Williamsburg-2.png
Colonial Williamsburg-2.png (23.39 KiB) Viewed 1168 times
[/center]

Job Title: Historic Trades Intern/Shoe Shop
Department: Historic Trades
Status: Non-exempt
Position Reports To: Master/Journeyman Supervisor of the shop


[hr][/hr]
PRIMARY FUNCTION:
This internship is a 4-5 month experience working with the shoemaking program, Historic Trades department at Colonial Williamsburg. Interns will assist the full-time staff in operation of the Shoe Shop exhibit, including interpretation and demonstration to guests, production, and research. In turn, interns have the opportunity to learn about the 18th-century shoemaking trade, develop trade skills, gain experience with public contact and service, and acquire insights about public history museums and living-history careers. Internship requires a commitment to a 40-hour 5 day work week. Costumes are provided. Locating housing is the responsibility of the intern. While internships are not offered for educational credit, we will work with individuals if their school has credited programs for which an Historic Trades internship might qualify.

[hr][/hr]
WORK TO BE PERFORMED:

Assist Historic Trade artisans and shop by interpreting current research and demonstrating trade to the public, engaging in production, undertaking assigned research projects, and performing other duties related to shop operation as assigned.

Provide outstanding customer service.

Follows safety and security procedures established for the site, tools, materials, and equipment.

Ensures that the safety and security procedures are followed in the absence of the supervisor and journeymen.

Performs other related duties as required.

[hr][/hr]
SUPERVISION TO BE EXERCISED:

Direct: None

Indirect: None

[hr][/hr]
DIRECTION RECEIVED:

From the master, journeyman supervisor, other journeymen, apprentices, at the Shoe Shop. There will be a written work/experience plan, and a full-time staff member will be assigned as the intern’s principal supervisor and mentor.

[hr][/hr]
QUALIFICATIONS: 

Minimum:
Demonstrated interest in traditional trades and a desire to explore the possibilities of a career as a public history museum professional. Good communication and guest service skills. Ability to work well as part of a shop team. Adaptability to changing shop schedules, interpretive themes, assignments, and special projects and programs. Manual dexterity and aptitude to learn trade skills. Physical requirements include working in a non-climate controlled building (no A/C or heat) in extreme weather conditions, ability to scale a ladder carrying a load, lift and carry 50 lbs., and perform the hand-skills of shoemaking. Must be able to work a flexible schedule, including occasional split-days off.

Applicants will be asked to submit a 2-3 page written statement of the experience they desire and what they offer to contribute to Trades operations.

Highly desired: Enrollment or completion in an undergraduate program in American History or on subject matter related to the intern experience. Experience working with the trade. Previous living history museum experience. Familiarity with the Colonial Williamsburg Historic Trades program.

Interested applicants, please make application on our careers website:

https://www.hrapply.com/cwf/AppJobView. ... 6&op=reset

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#206 Post by griffinmanos » Thu Sep 17, 2015 9:21 am

Hello shoe and bootmakers,
My name is Griffin Manos, and this is my first post. The reason that I am posting here, is because I am a college student who is interested in learning how to make shoes. I have come to the HCC per recommendation of Jesse and Marika of BK Bespoke, and Dan Freeman of Freeman's Leatherworks. I am interested in learning how to make shoes, but am not able to become a full time apprentice because I am still in school, in Bennington, Vermont. I am looking for a slow introduction to shoemaking close by to school, so that I may be able to gauge whether this is something that I want to invest my time and energy into once I am out of school. I understand that it is a lot of hard work and also the commitment involved, which is the reason that I am not quitting school to become an apprentice. However, I can say that I would be open to taking an apprenticeship over the summer (I know it's not that much time to do so) or for seven weeks in winter, as my school allows. If anyone has any ideas or questions for me please let me know, as I am in need of direction and resources to begin this journey. I am looking for experience in a shop working with leather and shoemaking equipment, as well as getting familiar with the process on a very basic level. Thanks so much, I look forward to hearing back from you.

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#207 Post by dw » Thu Sep 17, 2015 10:45 am

Griffin,

Welcome to the Crispin Colloquy.

As long a you're in Vermont, you couldn't do much better than Dan Freeman himself to teach you. All it requires is a honeyed tongue--you may have to sweet talk him, AFAIK, he's usually pretty busy.
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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#208 Post by griffinmanos » Sat Sep 19, 2015 10:00 am

Thanks for the welcome and quick reply! I do have plans to meet with Dan again soon to continue our conversation from the last time that I talked with him. I think that the main issue that has arisen is that I am still in school, and don't necessarily have enough time to dedicate to working for Dan to make it worthwhile for him. He is extremely busy in his work, and taking on someone with no experience who is not yet dedicated enough to quit school to become an apprentice full time would probably be more of a bother to him than a help, which we talked about and I totally understand from his point of view. I do recognize that he is one of the best in the area, and if I knew that this was what I wanted to spend my life doing, I would use all of my energy to not let him turn me down. However, I don't really know that this is what I want to do with my life, which is why I am thinking about a slower introduction to working in a shop so that I can know what I am getting myself into if I do decide to dedicate my life to the craft. I just don't want to take things too fast. We did talk a little about schools, but I have limited time and money for something like that, and honestly am looking for something a little less like a vacation or tourism which some (but definitely not all) of the schools I have seen seem to offer. Thanks again for the reply, and welcoming me here. I appreciate immensely any help I can get in my search.

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#209 Post by DesertRose » Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:41 am

I hope I'm not being too forward here. I was wondering if anyone knows of any western bookmakers in South or Central Texas, who might be interested in taking on an apprentice. I live on the Texas coast, but am willing to commute to an extent.

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#210 Post by dw » Thu Dec 03, 2015 7:27 pm

DesertRose » Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:41 am wrote:I hope I'm not being too forward here. I was wondering if anyone knows of any western bookmakers in South or Central Texas, who might be interested in taking on an apprentice. I live on the Texas coast, but am willing to commute to an extent.
Carl Chapelle over in St. Jo (?) is a good maker and a good teacher.
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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#211 Post by DesertRose » Tue Dec 08, 2015 12:40 pm

Ah! I wish I still lived in Dallas. St. Jo is a hop and skip away. If I ever move up there I'll pay him a visit. A Google search revealed a free custom shops within an hour of my house. I think I'll pay them a visit.
Is there any sort of process in reaching out and inquiring about an apprenticeship? When my friend was apprenticing with a tattoo artist, she had to have a portfolio of her work and at least a tattoo or two. Different trades, I know, but I thought I'd ask.

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#212 Post by brooklyn_edie » Tue Dec 08, 2015 9:37 pm

There's a whole list of custom bootmakers on Jennifer June's site:
http://dimlights.com/custom-boots/cowboyboot-makers/

You'd know better than me on who's near you. There may be others you'll find who are not on this list too.

Good luck

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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#213 Post by dw » Wed Dec 09, 2015 6:51 am

Jennifer June did a great job compiling that list--there are certainly more "makers" in every part of the country than when I began so many years ago. But since this thread is about "apprenticeships and schooling" it has to be said that not everyone on that list is willing to teach, nor even...no disrespect intended..."ready" to teach.

Seems like these days everyone wants to skip right over the learning and the mastery of skills and go right to the money. There is a sense out there that one can learn from YouTube videos and out-of-context snippets of advice on internet forums. And all too often the individual who is posting the YouTube video was a complete novice, themselves, not so long ago.

The best advice anyone wanting to learn to make boots or shoes...as anything but a hobby...can get is to devote a block of time to taking a class (or two or three) from someone who has been in the Trade for a good number of years and has proven not only their staying power and dedication but demonstrated their skills and range.

Look at the work of those individual makers who are willing to teach. Consider the attention to detail, the precision, the aesthetic sensibilities that the maker brings to the process. Consider the range and depth of knowledge that is on display. Don't choose someone to teach you because they are close by or cheap or offer a short class. And after some objective deliberation, choose the teacher that most closely represents the look (aesthetics) and the quality that you aspire to or want to achieve.

This Trade isn't easy to master. It cannot really be learned, much less mastered, in one week, or two weeks or even three weeks. Once upon a time it was a seven year apprenticeship. And it isn't easy to stay in it, either...esp. as a full time maker...given the dearth of resources and dwindling respect for the whole concept of "mastery." (We live in a culture where, for politically correct reasons alone if no other, we all too readily embrace mediocrity rather than excellence. No one dares or aspires to mastery.)

Boot or shoemaking is a lifetime study. It is not one and done. It is not, and cannot be learned from, a Tandy kit. In many real objective ways if the student isn't ready to make it a career and dedicate his/her life to it, rising above the amateur is going to be difficult.

And if a person is prepared to make that commitment, any relatively comprehensive class...no matter how long or expensive...is an investment that prepares you for the rest of your life.

And, in that context, cheap at half the price.
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Re: apprenticeships and schooling

#214 Post by dw » Wed Dec 09, 2015 9:11 am

I might add...and while the "spirit" moves me...that I post on a forum that is dedicated to high end men's wear, including shoes. I suspect I am somewhat notorious there for railing against the "factory mentality" that we all, in this society, seem to have bought into.

It is an almost unconscious philosophical perspective that values speed and efficiency and immediate gratification above all other factors. Places a premium on the "least amount of effort for the most amount of profit." And in most cases, as compared to historical...or just objective...standards, never seriously takes the idea of "quality" or "excellence" into consideration.

To some extent, esp. with even high end MTM shoes, manufactured work (and all the associated expediencies) have almost become the "gold standard". Most people have no idea (and many don't want to even know) how much better it can be and historically has been. Wouldn't recognize quality if it were demonstrated much less right before their eyes. Most people, IOW, accept that mediocrity, as a matter of course.

Perhaps that's a cynical attitude but one, it could easily be argued, that is borne out by reality. What bothers me (esp. in the context of this thread) is the tendency to treat students in the same manner. Process them...as many as can be fit into a given space at any one time...as if they were chickens at a kill facility. As if they were product on an assembly line.

Almost as problematic is that too many students accept that level of...what is it?...indifference?

And even if only in a metaphorical sense, like the output of an assembly line, I don't see how the results can be anything other than ticky-tacky.

:old&wise:
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