Schools

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dw
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Re: Schools

#51 Post by dw » Mon May 05, 2008 10:53 am

Well, I'm sure that there will be disagreement on this as well, but would think it was almost self-evident. I've made moccasin and I've made boots and I've made pretty credible shoes. A moccasin has no structure...it does not support the foot. It shares that attribute with pampooties or common footbags. There is no counter, no mid liner, no toe box, no shank support....it is in many ways, more akin to a flour sack dress than a tailored and interfaced dress or suit coat.

Because of the leathers that are often chosen (to conform to the foot) a moccasin generally has no aesthetic integrity...if the foot pronates, the moccasin pronates and stays that way. If the moccasin is worn wet, it is all too likely to stretch, irrecoverably, way out of shape.

Additionally the moccasin affords little in the way of easy refurbishment. When a sole is worn out, it takes nearly a rebuild of the moccasin to replace.

By contrast all of these attributes and the "fixes" for them, have been, over the centuries, addressed as the shoe has evolved. And certain standards of refinement, or aesthtics, as well as technique have also evolved, that far outstrip anything I have seen in primitive footwear.

I am well aware that countervailing arguments...and quibbles...can be made for all of this and certainly in certain circumstances and for some people a moccasin is not only a good option but maybe the preferred option. But you asked about evolution and the moccasin is a type of footwear designed for and more suited to, a far more rustic and casual lifestyle than most of us live.

Now having said all that, I must point out that I am in a fairly unique position (although there are certainly others on this board who share it) of having taught for 25 years; of having pursued footwear from sandal to shoe; of having achieved a certain level of "professionalism" and understanding, if not "mastery," such that I am sure I bring some ennui or even indifference to what others...less experienced...feel about this subject. I apologize if some of this leaks through.

But I have, in my time, apprenticed with people who were masters of the game. And the one thing I learned...and it is probably the most misunderstood or oft-forgotten precept in modern society...is that a student, to be a student, must suspend disbelief; must suspend objection; must even suspend personal opinion or they will never learn a dern thing. They have to literally sit at the teacher's feet...with all the implications of humility and self-deprecation...or it becomes a waste of both the teacher's time and the student's. It cannot be forced either. If the student cannot find it in themselves to do this the master cannot compel it.

The fact that I have been a student...and a good student at that...is the single most critical qualification to be a teacher. I am of the opinion that one of the most crucial factors in the decline of "traditional" Trades, or traditional knowledge is simply that unwillingness, by young moderns, to humble themselves and their opinions to another individual...even for a minute. They are all...16 to 60...trying so hard to establish credibility and respect that they never think twice about trying to "teach their old granny to suck eggs."

For me, credibility and respect is all in the results...period. The proof is in the pudding, so to speak and frankly, even though I will, in my position as Administrator of this forum, advance a thesis or prod a person who I totally respect for a more detailed answer (so that even the novices may learn) I have to admit to a certain indifference as to whether any one individual accepts my perspectives or not. If you ask me a question, I will do my level best to give you an honest answer...whether it be about moccasins or mukluks but if an individual does not like that answer, that's their lookout.

The point here is that even with the best of intentions (and that is required), what a student learns and where they go with their learning...where they want to end up...is totally up to them, not the teacher (although the teacher can be a critical factor); not the venue; and certainly not whether it is online or in a book or face to face.Image

Nasser,

Very interesting. my only comments would be...first, imagine having to resole any of the first four?!; and second, the last two, although ostensibly a moccasin construction, are more shoe than moccasin. The name (moccasin) abides on all of these but the philosophical underpinnings are long since lost...

...to the pressure to evolve or die!Image

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Re: Schools

#52 Post by dearbone » Mon May 05, 2008 2:40 pm

DW,

Oh,you are so old school,it takes a while to like you or even stand you,but there is truth in what you say and being me,i always submit to the truth,you are right about the apprentice suspending everything before the teacher,i personaly went through this with my teacher,i had to forget what i knew by 4 years of trying on my own,exact words from the teacher mouth to me with all the pride of my youth with standing, He said "As long as you sit here cross the bench from me,you are always wrong and i am always right.i was crushed,and when i asked why,he asked my age, than he said i have been making shoes more than two and half time you lived on this earth,he was 86 at the time,it was hard for me for a while,but when i suspended objections,i begin to receive the massege,two and half years i worked under his watchful eyes,after few months we became friends and i served him better than i served my father and when i left he said he made a good shoemaker out of me.And thank God i was lucky.
Nasser

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Re: Schools

#53 Post by large_shoemaker_at_large » Mon May 05, 2008 3:52 pm

HMMM

This is very interesting. The first fellow who taught me how to made a shoe for myself as stock foot wear never fit well, taught all he knew and having watched be go from a Prothetic/orthotic tech to supposidly dumbing down to be a shoemaker as the boss at the time said. Howard had no formal training just apprentised by a snarrly old drunk. Put as a type seller in a prevouis life he had an eye for perfection and the old time work ethic to always do better. So he helped me make a last, patterns uppers welting soling. Most by hand and some machine. I was trilled to shoe them to my folks that was in 78. I worked with another fellow who also taught me alot. I showed him how to make lasts with Otto Bock Foam (lateral thinking) 1980 When I went to an apprentichip with a Euorpean Master, in shoe maker he taught me as he admitted " I will never teach all I know . I believe this was an attitude of never wanting anyone to excel past him. His commentes were rude and cutting. But him and his son sure wanted all my knowledge on Vacuming plastics, laminating and foam techniques. I asked for time off to go to Toronto for a course in gait analsis and anatomy he hit the roof! Was insulted big time, at the time the Canadian Orthopedic Footwear Association was forming and he viewed this as a union not a professioanl association. We soon parted ways. I started on my own willing to make mistakes, take any education offered in North America I could find (pre internet days) and as they say full speed ahead , Damn the torpedoes. So in 1987 I was granted my papers from the asociation. Had to document a custom pair of shoes Pics lasts, patterns et all, a case of and othrotics and modification.and referances from medical proffessionals.

So there is a view from the other side. I had a martial arts teacher say I will never teach you all as I am the teach and you will forever be my student. Later over a few beer I said I was insulted! I explained a teacher should be happy when a student excells and my even pass the Master, this shows the teacher has taught the theory and practice and the concept of getting to do what you can see in your mind or dream in your heart. He fianally understood what I was getting at and we became good friends and helped each other as he also did taxidermy.

Most of this thread would be moot if the making of footwear was offered in the same lite as other trades/proffesions. No formal schools in all of North America were you could learn and graduate with a diploma or Degree, shame on all educational insitutions, Shame, Shame, I wrote a shoe repair program that sits on a shelf at the local tech college due to polotics period.
As I have mentioned , got hasseled for trying to get a shoemaking program with BCIT'S Prtosthetic/Orhtotic program. Again from turf stomping buy a very few.

Shoemaking may not be a trendy profession but used to be one of the proudest Guilds. So what happened to us in North America?

Form meets function! a western boot in the Arctic is not a good idea, riding a horse with stirrups in Mocassins is not a good idea. Running a marathon on pavement in pointe shoes is not a good idea.
Nasser nice pics I wished I could see them better but thats ok, I love the old stuff. Where there any prices? Probably cheaper than a gallon of gas

Regards
Brendan

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Re: Schools

#54 Post by dw » Mon May 05, 2008 4:23 pm

Nasser,

I don't know what to say. I'm not even sure how to take it. I guess I'm glad you said "it takes a while." Maybe that implies that enough time has passed now that you have come to the point where you can at least stand me.

But I am even more old school in some senses than might be readily apparent. For instance, I think the words "love" and "Art" are overused to the point of abuse. I recognize that most folks on the Internet are a good deal less than articulate if only because of the nature of the Internet. As a consequence, I never judge anyone, or decide if I like them or not until I can look in their eyes and hear the tone of their voice. I read the remarks posted here and to me they are just disembodied voices...no personality attached. How can there be?

Of course there are people who are so intolerant and so confrontational and who take advantage of the relative anonymity of the Internet that I do not want to deal with them. Nevermind what their character is like, their behaviour is unacceptable.

I think you had a wise and generous master. When you come right down to it...and sweeping aside all the intangibles such as respect and deference and humility...at some point you know deep in your heart that you can never repay that person for all he has given you. Even if you paid him ten thousand dollars for a three week course...or one-hundred thousand dollars...it would never be enough to compensate him for the life he has given you and the mistakes he steered you around and the price, in painful experiences, that he protected you from. That's true and unselfish generosity and the only way you can ever pay it back is to pass it on. To help with an open heart those who come seeking with an open heart.

As far as truth is concerned...I am confidant that I have it often enough to tip the scales. Not because I made it up. Not because I am inherently wise. But rather because I am passing it on.

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Re: Schools

#55 Post by dearbone » Mon May 05, 2008 5:43 pm

DW,

With all respect, please take it as a complement,i was brought up to respect my elders,regardless,but you happenend to be in my trade as well as an elder and i agree with you, I can never pay my master to conpensate him,but he was happy to see me taking all is due and bowed my head to him in respect in the end.
I was wondering about the staff you were holding in the wedding picture, can you part the mississippi with it?
Regards Nasser

(Message edited by dearbone on May 05, 2008)

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Re: Schools

#56 Post by dw » Mon May 05, 2008 5:54 pm

Nasser,

Image

No, but I can dern sure part some wise-crackin', young whippersnapper's hair for him. Image

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Re: Schools

#57 Post by dw » Mon May 05, 2008 6:00 pm

Nasser,

PS...that "staff" is known as a cromach and it proves another old and venerable truth--that with a stout cromach and two good legs underneath you, you can fall asleep while standing up. Image

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Re: Schools

#58 Post by dearbone » Mon May 05, 2008 7:01 pm

DW,

Thanks you for puting a smile on my face all day today,so long.

Nasser

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Re: Schools

#59 Post by kadwart » Tue May 06, 2008 6:35 am

DW - my you sure get feisty at times... Leaving aside the questions of ennui and indifference, let me assure you there is a method to my madness.

From the point of view of trying to teach in other than face-to-face situations, it is sometimes useful to both ask questions for which there are - to some - self evident answers. And it is definitely useful to have answers to those questions.

I see no particular shame in asking what to you are stupid, irrelevant, irreverent or annoying questions because I am pretty certain that if I don't ask I am certainly not going to get an answer.

And I equally feel that even if you are so far past the point of finding the answers to these questions more than just annoyances there might be one or two other newbs out there who might find the answers useful. Some of my reasons for saying this are noted below.

Your discussion suggested an evolutionary model. While the "how-tos" of shoemaking would indicate what you do, it might not answer why you do it. This, as I see it, is an area that is useful to explore if you are considering curricular/instructional design that is distance modelled or that incorporates class and distance education.

And the context of this conversation arose duing Paul's expression of interest in helping to put together something that would help those who sommehow can't find that appreticeship or who could not take advantage of one for whatever reason

Given the dearth of formal footwear training in North America where some of those questions could be put aside to be clarified during an apprenticeship model, knowing WHY something works better or is an improvement, and IN WHAT CONTEXTS it might be more appropriate (something that Brendan touched on) becomes a useful reference point. It would ceertainly provide a rational, empirical grounding

In other words, the answers to my question would have provided some of the rational steps in the transtion from "simple" to "complex" forms of footwear (in your frame of reference some of the evolutionary steps that lead you to say that mocs are less evolved). Which in turn could provide some of the steps in one way of addressing an education and training issue (designing a course for example around a transition from less to more evolved footwear).

My apologies if obliquely addressing an issue of curricular design starts at too basic a level for general consumption.

The West Coast trilobites back Image
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Re: Schools

#60 Post by dw » Tue May 06, 2008 7:16 am

There are no stupid or irrelevant questions. I don't think I used those words, implied them or agree with them. We are all born ignorant but stupid is a choice.

And if I were to define "choice" in the larger context we are exploring I would have to say that it is when one asks a question but is unwilling to accept the answer. That's a choice if only because no one forces anyone here to accept it. Or, another might be for the sole purpose of challenging the answer. That's another choice albeit one with a hidden agenda. This is where my indifference and ennui comes to the fore. If a person asks me for my opinion...and that's all it ever has been...and is unwilling to consider it objectively, I get to feeling like there is no purpose in pursuing it.

I seldom get annoyed--I've been teaching for far too long (another field of in-depth experiences that some may not share) and sincere, earnest questions delight me rather than annoy me. I realize that in ten years posting to this board, and being far and away the most prolific poster on the board, it is tempting to think I get paid by the word. But peanuts for pronouns is still only a bare living wage, let me assure you. Those who post here to help...to a man (or woman)...do so for primarily altruistic reasons.

Mine is just one opinion. This is just a discussion board. Nothing is written in stone, nothing will be decided here. If you don't like the answer, no big deal. In an infinite and benign (mostly) universe, someone else will.

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Re: Schools

#61 Post by dw » Tue May 06, 2008 7:28 am

PS...

Sorry you feel that I am feisty. I don't feel feisty, or grumpy or anything else. If there is anything "untoward" about my latest comments it is simply another in a long series of attempts to set, by example, a tone (maybe not the only one possible) for posting to the board. As one of the guys who sweep up around here, I get to choose which broom I use.

Sometimes there's a little bit of caramel corn in with the peanuts.

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(Message edited by dw on May 06, 2008)

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Re: Schools

#62 Post by j_johansen » Tue May 06, 2008 9:17 am

Paul,
I wanted to try awnsering your original question. I too have been to Alan Z's, and have also taken two of DW's classes. I left Alan's inspired to use a treadle machine and be as low tech as possible. When I first arrived at DW's wearing Ugg boots there definitely was a raised eyebrow (I hadn't worn socks, or anything but Ugg's or flip-flops for about two years).
I definitely think it is possible to make a western boot low tech, but I'm not sure you would want to after seeing it done with all the machinery added into the process. If I was in your position I'd take DW's class. The face to face interaction and seeing of the technique is a must. Then after seeing how a master does it you can more easily evolve, or devolve the technique. I've got all the machines, but sideseam by hand, and have abandoned the stacked leather heel for a lower one.
I make no apologies for being mystical about it, there is something else beyond technique, knowledge, and words transmitted. As much as I want to make boots, those boots want to be made. That yearning for creation lives in all craftspeople. I think humans are by nature learning machines, and there are always exeptions (Rodger Bannister for instance), but for the most part that learning is MODEL IMPERATIVE. I feel that learning face to face with DW has given me AT LEAST a five year head start on someone who didn't take such a class as his. I also think I may never know just how big of an advantage I've been given as I am quite literally standing on his shoulders. Now if I could just get my balance!...............
J.

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Re: Schools

#63 Post by fred_coencped » Tue May 06, 2008 3:32 pm

Paul,
I took a quick look at the Sodhopper site and would like to expess some thoughts and experience to you.
I started in 1972 making sandals to the foot ,over 1000 pair in 5 years.In `73 met my teacher and started to make the last.
Around 1985 I commissioned a pair of moccasins from one of the franchise operation utilizing the duct tape system over a wool sock.I wore these for several years and as DW describes a "footbag",I agree.
However,after experiencing heel and archilles tendon pain with cramping in both calves,while trecking all over Ireland ,there I was practically cripled.
Now my point is this.After creating a moccasin last for myself I took the inside out construction apart removed the insole and proceeded to last the Moccasin boots with a leather toe box and heel counter with extra depth on the last for a custom footbed,orthotic or what I sometimes refer to as an innersole.
I know very well this construction of the sodhopper, and no, it is not a true moccasin by obvious definition.
Now it is not a footbag and it does not compare to the dress wellington but it certainly has enough structual integrity as any well made western boot.I did create the last with 1/2" heel height and incorporated a wedge design for midfoot stability.So I call this so called moccasin a boot.
My next case scenario is the sandal.After making several dozen orthopedic custom sandals from developing the sandal last from the the negative model of the foot and fitting custom foot orthotics on flimsy thin strapped ladies sandals with generous heel cup height design,any unwanted compensation can be blocked and a normal gait pattern be attained.
Last but not least is the canine orthopedic booties with removable footbeds.the difficult part is casting the front and the back legs semi weight bearing via a torso sling.
So both the moccasin and sandal can be as supportive as a well made shoe or boot and does not have to resemble a footbag at all.
One further thought on our teachers and our ancestry.I personally regard both in the highest esteem possible and have just recently after 12 years accidentally found my 90 year old mentor in Florida.
Anyway you teachers and educators out there,thank you and know I am at your service and on your heels.
Peace ,Fred

relferink

Re: Schools

#64 Post by relferink » Mon May 12, 2008 7:08 pm

All,

Very old school how you were all taught and certainly not the way I was trained. No sitting in front of a master and shutting up for me, more of a team effort to teach and pass on knowledge while encouraging questions and exploring alternate approaches.

I want to ask the readers that are in the process of learning how to make shoes / boots and those considering learning to take a short survey. 5 short questions about what you, as students want in a way of tuition and help. This may not go anywhere but we need information to see if anything can be set up. No personal information is collected, just ideas being floated.

Thanks in advance for participating and stay posed for the results right here.

Rob

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Re: Schools

#65 Post by jtoth4 » Tue May 13, 2008 6:31 am

Rob,

Could you post your email so I can answer your 5 question survey off the colloquy.

Thanks, Joe

relferink

Re: Schools

#66 Post by relferink » Tue May 13, 2008 9:48 am

Joe,

If you click on my name in top of the post you'll see my email address. Feel free to email me BUT before you or anyone else sends me survey results I have to ask you to use the survey. It runs on a web server outside the Colloquy website. The answers collected are put together and only totals are shown, no personal info is collected.

For example so far the results on question 4:
Find a really cool hobby 16.7%
Making shoes for myself 50%
Make shoes for family and friends as a hobby 50%
Try to make a living hand making footwear 83.3%
Use the knowledge in a footwear related career (not personally hand making) 16.7%
other 33.4%
Answered Question: 6
Skipped question: 0

The reason for the survey is to find some trends and identify where people need help learning the gentle craft. At this point it's to early to discuss individual requests or go into great detail.

One last note, you do not need to be a HCC member or registered user for the Colloquy to participate. If the link in the above post does not work for you just copy and paste the following string into your browser to take the survey: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?sm=lP3_2b1jBRSS3cr_2faNk8gV0g_3d_3d

Thanks for participating.

Rob

relferink

Re: Schools

#67 Post by relferink » Sun Jun 01, 2008 5:14 pm

All,

So far 21 readers have participated in the survey and here are the results up to now:
Note: listings are in the order they were entered and received in the survey, not order of importance or frequency.
7596.jpg

Other comments:
  • 1. Classic styles all around.
  • 2. I don't necessarily want to make all types
  • 3. Extremely wide or narrow for the very hard foot to fit.
  • 4. sandals
  • 5. I make roman footwear and up till now the use of a last has not been necessary. The romans also had closed boots which were made on lasts. It is thought that they made lasted shoes much like a modern shoes are made. The soles would be stitched, not glued. It is the use of a last to made shoes plus the construction of the last itself which interests me at this point.
  • 6. Moccasins Sandals
  • 7. Orthotics to insert into custom shoes. For self if not for others.
  • 8. devolved moccasins!!! Oh, all right = "mocs" that are closer to the ones Nasser posted. I see this as a progress from a simple to more complex form.

7595.jpg


Books used:
  • 1. Chappell's
  • 2. dw's books
  • 3. Make Your Own Shoes - Mary Wales Loomis; Bespoke Shoemaking - Tim Skyrme (on order)
  • 4. Vass, Wilheim, Thornton, Koleff, Skyrme, Smith
  • 5. Handmade Shoes for Men, Western Packers, DW Frommer
  • 6. "the Make it yourself Shoe Book", "Craft Manual of North American Indian Footwear"
  • 7. Texas Boots
  • 8. Shoe & Boot Designing Manual, Manual of Shoemaking, Handmade Shoes for Men
  • 9. Simple shoe making, Tim Skyrme's book, Handmade shoes for men
  • 10. DW Frommer's,
  • 11. Bespoke, Pattern books by Koleff and Jones, HMSFM, Clyde Edwards Ortho, others?
  • 12. HMSFM - Koleff
  • 13. Golding, Bardolli, Swaysland, Tim Skirmy, Mary Wales Loomis, DW, and many many more
  • 14. Sharon Raymon'ds, parts of Golding (I think)

DVD / Video's used (listed in order of survey entry):
  • 1. Chappell's, the old south American fellow who uses a bottle, knife, sharpening stone and beat um bare bones sewing machine
  • 2. orthoedic shoemaking Denes Szabo
  • 3. Crispin Vids.
  • 4. Sodhopper's Set
  • 5. Randall Merrell's pre-school Video
  • 6. Cordwainer Vol XIV, Cordwainers Vol VI, Cordwainer Vol V
  • 7. Sharon Raymond's
  • 8. Carl Chappell' s
  • 9. Colloquy based
  • 10. Hcc videos, Wilson Gracie, Shoeschool video

Other:
  • 1. Shoe School
  • 2. Operate a shoe repair/orthopedic shop, have some knowledge of leathers, glues and sewing.
  • 3. none so far
  • 4. http://www.romanarmy.com/cms/
  • 5. Notes from classes and personal trainning
  • 6. Shoe School
  • 7. HCC and Western Bootmaker Sites
  • 8. Moccasin and Sandal making
  • 9. Experience shoe repairman
  • 10. DW's Western Boot Class, Sissy Puccio, Shoeschool .com
  • 11. this forum, you tube,internet,etc
  • 12. web based - Marc Carlson's site for historical, the Colloquy

7594.jpg

Listed as other for question 4:
  • 1. last making
  • 2. theater
  • 3. Feel it would be a great asset to an already existing business
  • 4. Improve my leather working skills and knowledge
  • 5. The Joy of Life, lived learning new things and challenging myself.
  • 6. Fun (OK, an exercise in contemplative discipline with practical intent)

7593.jpg

additional comments by questions 5:
  • 1. just want to send a photo and email with questions; too much instruction takes away from current business.
  • 2. Advice and help on where to source materials would be welcomed. A kind of 'beginner pack' or advice on what you genuinely need, what you can adapt from something else, and most importantly where to start looking for it
  • 3. Because of the nature of my life (kids, school) it is difficult (but not impossible) for me to commit to set course work where I would be required to produce work, for example, once a week. I'd love to have a mentor who I could go to once a month or so.
  • 4. face-to-face and one-on-one is the best way for me to learn.
  • 5. I live in a very remote area.. so travel/cost are absolute decider..........
  • 6. Ideally I would love to see a program taught somewhere in the US. I would devote a year or two to a dedicated Cordwainery School.
  • 7. Everyone has a different learning curve, with me I need to have a one on one, watch, try, accept critique, have good notes to follow when home, and be able to contact teacher with questions
  • 8. Ongoing study of the various styles of women's shoes.
  • 9. I have a small interest in this,mostly as a hobby although it does relate to my profession-so is very useful knowledge. I do not think at this point( with the limited time I have available) that I would be able to use a directed learning model. It is interesting to see the gamut of opinions on learning/teaching, I have found that with my training( and training I have provided others) It is a poor teacher that can not teach a good student to learn to overcome the teachers areas of shortcoming. Most people can be taught how to do a task a certain way,understanding why it is done one way and not the other,is how we gain mastery and advancement.
  • 10. OK, so your questions re:beginning. I am acquiring material and tools and have been doing so for the past 2 years. It takes a long time because I work part time and tend to a special needs teenager so my time and resources are limited. I have purchased a small run of lasts for the mocs which can also be used to make low heeled footwear. I have a thwack load of small, inexpensive hand tools, and I am in process of getting some sewing machines (the theory is I am getting a Tippmann for simple outseamed, an old Singer 29-4 for other stuff and possibly a flatbed of some kind but this deal has been in process for the past 6 months so I still don't have stuff yet). I have one book - Sharon Raymond's - and would like to get more. With luck I will take my first trip away from my offspring in 14 years to visit a friend who has promised basic instruction in repair (a good way to start), and hopefully his teacher who is now 86 will teach me how to pattern. I am interested in anything and everything instructional but travel is an issue both because of the expense and the time away from family. I think a modular curriculum where you pick and choose should follow after the basic techniques are determined and practiced. Which reminds me, I have been practising various things making small stuff not shoe related, However I still sew like a drunken monkey and can't sharpen worth a toss. I am putting in this info because you might need to add a few more questions to the survey. People don't always start with books and courses - they sometimes start with stuff they might need like tools. In other words you need stuff to practice with as well as the knowledge. You are not going to get agreement on the preferred method. Making is very hands on and for people that can't be there in person you will need to try and accomodate different learning styles and preferences. You are going to need to make things achievable as the standard rubric is that adults are self directed learners. I don't know about that but they like to achieve. Many adult students I have had want their hand held and to be spoon fed but this was in knowledge based rather than skill based areas. In order to answer the 5th question you really need to know what the subjects are. Take my sewing. i know I have to do it. I know I will loathe it and it will drive me crazy. Don't make it optional or I will avoid it! Are you familiar with WEB CT formats? They are not bad. They also give students the chance to talk to each other and opportunities for group discussion. You would need to talk to a distance ed designer about that. But they will allow for feeds, demos and other useful and nifty things... OK, so you know who this is, or probably can guess and I can't get into curricular stuff in this tiny box, but feel free to e-mail me if you would like to chat. S


I want to thank all that have filled out the survey so far, your answers will be helpful in finding a way to preserve the gentle craft. For those that have not yet had a chance to do so, this is as good a time as any to answer a few questions
I can not stress enough that the more responses received, the more valuable the survey will become.

Thanks again for all your help so far, keep up the good work!

Rob

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Re: Schools

#68 Post by sharon_raymond » Sat Jun 14, 2008 7:26 am

I received a call from a "soccer mom" who is desperate to find someone to make soccer shoes for her talented daughter who is allergic to "thiuram mix" cement in regular soccer shoes. People willing to look into this can contact her at Lisa_Briscoe63@yahoo.com

Sharon

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Re: Schools

#69 Post by joey » Wed Aug 06, 2008 4:10 am

Hi everyone,

I am scheduled to go to L.A from the 24th to 30th of August and I'm looking for someone to help me with a sample I need to make, so if you guys know anyone who'd give private lessons (I'm looking for something affordable) in the area, please let me know!! Doesnt have to be IN L.A, anywhere near is fine... ThanksImage

Joey

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Re: Schools

#70 Post by dw » Tue May 07, 2013 5:36 am

test
DWFII--HCC Member
Without "good" there is no "better," without "better," no "best."
And without the recognition that there is a hierarchy of excellence in all things, nothing rises above the level of mundane.

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Re: Schools

#71 Post by salsa » Tue May 07, 2013 5:53 am

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Re: Schools

#72 Post by MacSuibhne » Tue May 07, 2013 5:59 am

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Re: Schools

#73 Post by salsa » Tue May 07, 2013 6:54 am

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SCAD is seeking a Professor of Accessory Design

#74 Post by kevans » Tue May 07, 2013 8:48 am

SCAD Savannah seeks candidates for full-time faculty positions in accessory design. Expertise in handbag design and small leather goods, pattern making and construction as well as technical experience in design theory is preferred. Additionally, candidates also may have design and construction experience in footwear and millinery. Qualified candidates should have a terminal degree or its equivalent in accessory design or a related field. College-level teaching experience is preferred.

To apply, please visit the SCADjobs website at the link below:

https://scadjobs.com/applicants/Central?quickFind=53319

Should you have questions regarding your application package, you may submit an email to Human Resources at scadfaculty@scad.edu.

ABOUT SCAD
The Savannah College of Art and Design is a private, nonprofit, accredited institution conferring bachelor’s and master’s degrees in distinctive locations and online to prepare talented students for professional careers. The diverse student body of more than 11,000 comes from all 50 United States, three U.S. territories and more than 100 countries worldwide. The education and career preparation of each student are nurtured and cultivated by a faculty of more than 700 professors with extraordinary academic credentials and valuable professional experience. Through individual attention in an inspiring university environment, and with advanced, professional-level technology, equipment and learning resources, SCAD is uniquely qualified to provide an exceptional education and unparalleled career preparation. SCAD has garnered acclaim from respected organizations and publications; see the latest at www.scad.edu/recognition. SCAD is an Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer and welcomes all persons without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation or disability.

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Re: Schools

#75 Post by homeboy » Tue Nov 11, 2014 1:16 pm

Recently returned from an intense, but enjoyable, three week shoemaking course with my mentor and good friend D.W. Frommer, II. It had been 15 years since I had knelt at the master's feet. As I walked up to the shop the vert first morning, I pondered if the stories were true. Rumors from the shadows that depicted the master having grown into a mean, cantankerous, old troll who devoured students without mercy. My heart raced as I crept up to the entrance of the shop......
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